Tag Archives: Travel

Peru and the Amazon River~Part 2

18 Apr

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

Amazon River Commerce

As we traveled to our next location on the live a board, we saw several rafts along the way. They are going to a market to sell their goods.

They would build live aboard rafts with everything sellable even the balsa wood that makes the raft. They would live in them for days or weeks until reaching their destination where they could sell the goods. Then take a water service back home.

 

 

There are no bridges that cross the Amazon, mostly because there is no need, the majority of the Amazon River runs through rainforests rather than roads or cities.

The river is the principal path of transportation for people and produce in the regions, with transport ranging from balsa rafts and dugout canoes to hand built wooden river craft and modern steel hulled craft.

 

 

 

The river markets are busy. This is their grocery, pharmacy, household supplies and gathering place. They can buy many things including natural medicines for healing from the rainforest.

 

 

 

Some goods are brought to street markets in other locations. We were able to walk around here, but the guide would not allow us to bring money or cameras because of the pick pockets. A small distance away was a tent village full of the extremely poor.

 

Back on the boat, we docked at our next location where we will take a walk in the rainforest and visit the Shaman.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

A 2016 Dawn Patrol Rendezvous Trip~Part 15

12 Apr

A Slice of Life

Bill Lites

 

Day 15 (Thursday Oct.13, 2016)

 

I was up early this morning, and had a delicious breakfast at the Bob Evens Restaurant just down the road from the motel. With a full tummy, and since I didn’t have to be at the airport until after lunch (2:00 pm), I decided to drive around the Columbus area, to see what I could find of interest.

 

 

I drove up and down what looked like busy business streets, but came across nothing much of interest in the area where I had stayed. I Googled “Things to do in Columbus,” and one of the things recommended was German Village. So I picked the Schiller Park, which was said to have an interesting “Umbrella Girl Fountain” on display. It turned out to be a beautiful but small park, and the fountain display was very restful.

 

 

By the time I got through checking out the Schiller Park and the “Umbrella Girl Fountain” it was getting close to noon, and I thought I better get something to eat to tide me over, on the Southwest “Peanut Flight” back to Orlando. Google had also informed me, that one of the best places to eat, in the German Village area, was the “German Village Coffee Shop” located on Thurman Street. I found it (it was tiny) and tried one of their grilled ham and cheese sandwiches. I’m not sure what all the “Hoopla” is about?

 

 

Then I headed for the Enterprise Rental Car office to turn in my car. That process went well, and I tried to call an Uber ride. That didn’t go so well, until one of the Enterprise agents helped me out. I had a ride within ten minutes, and was delivered to the John Glenn Columbus International Airport in another fifteen minutes. What a great service!

 


The non-stop Southwest flight from Columbus to Orlando was on time, smooth, and the peanuts were fresh. Those peanut bags are really small, and I had to ask for an extra bag. I was in the first row isle seat on the left, so was one of the first off the plane in Orlando. The walk from the arrival gate, to the tram into the main terminal, and the wait at Baggage Claim took almost as long as the flight had.

 

 

My lovely wife, Divoran, picked me up at the arrival area, and we headed north on SR-436 looking for somewhere to eat dinner. She let me know that she had her mouth set for pizza, and we were able to find a small Pizzeria not far from the airport. We enjoyed the food and time alone together, bringing each other up to date, mostly about her adventures with Hurricane Matthew.

 

 

The trip home to Titusville was uneventful, and I was glad to be home where I could unwind and sleep in my own bed for a change. Living out of a suitcase gets old in a hurry, and people’s loud TV at night doesn’t help. And as they say, “Home is where the heart is.” At least until I can plan another of my exciting travel adventures. Hope you have enjoyed hearing about this road trip and will join me for the next trip, when I will be exploring the many museums of the American North Country.

 

 

 

—–The End—–

Peru and the Amazon River~Part 1

11 Apr

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

The Amazon and it’s Indigenous People

 

The Amazon River is the greatest expression of life on earth. The rainforest holds answers to questions we have yet to ask. But it is rapidly disappearing.

 

 

The Amazon River is by far the world’s largest river by volume. It has over 1,100 tributaries, 17 of which are longer than 1000 miles. The Amazon rainforest is the largest tropical rainforest in the world, covering 1.4 billion acres.

The Amazon is home to more species of plants and animals than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet — perhaps 30 percent of the world’s species are found there.

Although indigenous people have lived on their lands for thousands of years, they do not own it, because they have not filed “deeds” of land and do not possess a “title.” Therefore governments and other outsiders do not recognize their rights to the land. Indigenous peoples possess an enormous body of almost irreplaceable information and skills about living in the rainforest without destroying it.

 

 

“Within the next few decades, the fate of the world’s remaining indigenous peoples, the fragile environments they occupy, and the valuable knowledge that they embody could well be decided once and for all. A number of individuals, corporations, and states are already pursuing their own “final solutions.”

 

 

The 20th century will be remembered either as the century when we destroyed much of the Earth’s genetic and cultural diversity, or the century when peoples learned to live together and share their knowledge in order to maintain the diversity upon which we all depend. Great civilizations like the Mayas, Incas, and Aztecs developed complex societies and made great contributions to science. Living from nature and lacking the technology to dominate their environment, native peoples have learned to watch their surroundings and understand the intricacies of the rainforest. Over generations these people have learned the importance of living within their environment and have come to rely on the countless renewable benefits that forests can provide.

 

 

Cattle ranching accounts for roughly 70 percent of deforestation in the Amazon. The world’s forests need to be seen for what they are—giant global utilities, providing essential public services to humanity on a vast scale. They store carbon, which is lost to the atmosphere when they burn, increasing global warming. The life they support cleans the atmosphere of pollutants and feeds it with moisture. They act as a natural thermostat, helping to regulate our climate and sustain the lives of 1.4 billion of the poorest people on this Earth. And they do these things to a degree that is all but impossible to imagine.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Memories of New Mexico~Part 6

9 Apr

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

I really love New Mexico. I actually don’t remember anything about living in Dallas, Texas, but then, I was only four years old when we moved from there to Albuquerque. I think the “memories” I have of the house in Dallas are from pictures I’ve seen, and the stories others have told me about it.

 

 

I do have one memory of Dallas – we attended the First Baptist Church in Dallas. I have a very vague memory of black-and-white tiles on a floor, and the smell of Pinesol. Mother told me that the nursery at the church had a floor like that, and that they used Pinesol as a cleaner. But that’s it!

Now, New Mexico…that’s a whole different story. I’ve given you pictures of our house – we lived in that house the entire time I lived there. It wasn’t sold until after my father died – and mother lived there more than five years until she married again and they moved into an apartment.

I had a most unique experience with that house in later years. It was in 1993, when my mother died. Fred and I, as well as my brother, Bill and his wife, DiVoran, flew out for mother’s funeral. Our oldest daughter, Karen and her husband, Brian, decided to drive from South Carolina to Albuquerque for the funeral, as well. On this particular day – the day after the funeral – Fred and Bill had stayed at the apartment to arrange shipment of some of mother’s things that each of us wanted. Brian drove his car with Karen, DiVoran and myself in it. I wanted to show him where we had lived and grown up.

We drove to the house, and he stopped the car in front of the house. As we sat, looking at the house, with me describing what was where, the couple who owned the house, came out and looked at us. I rolled down my window, and assured them that it was okay – that I had grown up in that house. I nearly fell out of the car when they asked if we would like to come in and see it now. Remember now, it had been about 22 years since I had been in that house!

I was NOT about to pass up that invitation!! So we all piled into the house. I would point out things for Brian – I think Karen might have been a bit too young to remember much about it, as well – and tell what we had then. When we arrived in the kitchen, I mentioned that mother had painted the cabinets pink, and that we had green linoleum on the floor. The husband looked at me and said, “ I remember stripping pink paint from those cabinets!” DiVoran and I then explained that mother had pink plastic (like Melmac) dishes, and she wanted to “match.”

 

 

Pink cabinets, green linoleum – Granny holding Trixie, Mom, Boots the cat, all in the kitchen

When we got to the bathroom, I told them that we had green tile around the tub/shower. Again, he looked at me, and said, “I tiled white tiles over those green ones.” I guess it showed him that I had, indeed, grown up in that house. I told him how mom and dad had added the patio and cover that joined the house to the garage. They had a large bamboo shade that they could roll up or down, depending upon whether the sun was beating down on it, such as at supper time. We enjoyed many, many meals out on that patio.

I still think it was quite brave of that couple to invite four strangers into their house!

More memories to come…..

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

A Journey to Peru and the Amazon River

4 Apr

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

As a child, I remember my father always watching travel shows on tv. Later in his life he was able to travel extensively after playing the stock market. He said he made more money doing that than ever working. I was so happy for him and my Mom. However, my Mom tired of traveling so my dad would go alone.
One day he asked me to go vacation with him to Peru on a live aboard boat down the Amazon River. I couldn’t contain my excitement. What an awesome opportunity he gave me. It was his last trip before he passed away. It was a most precious time.
I would like to share this series of incredible events and sights on this trip, which includes Peru, Nazca lines, the Amazon people and the way they live.

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Memories of New Mexico~Part 6

2 Apr

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

 

Last time, I showed you our “new” house in Albuquerque, and the Bataan Memorial Park across the street from our house. Now let me tell you a bit about some of the other parks in Albuquerque.

One that I really enjoyed going to was called Roosevelt Park.

 

 

From Google Search I found the following:

Roosevelt Park was built in 1933 with federal Civil Works Administration funds. Originally called Terrace Park, it was later renamed after President Franklin Roosevelt. The park survived periods of neglect, crime, and dying trees to undergo a $2.8 million renovation and clean up in 2007. Today, it endures as one of Albuquerque’s oldest and most cherished public spaces.

 The park’s 13 acres feature more than 2,250 trees and bushes, including umbrella catalpas and some 200 Siberian elms. There are grassy areas for picnicking, along with a Frisbee golf course. Of interesting note, the abutment on the south side of the park was made from stone recovered when the county jail at Rio Grande and Central was demolished.

 

While this notation says that it was renovated in 2007, it was always a lovely, grassy, rolling-hill park when I was just a child, and my family and I thoroughly enjoyed going there.

Credit Google Search

Credit Google Search

Credit Google Search

Credit Google Search

 

I remember having my “surprise” 12th birthday party there. My Aunt Jessie had told Mother – within my hearing – that she was going to Roosevelt Park, and with my childish begging, asked to go with her. When they both consented, I thought I had really pulled the wool over their eyes….until we arrived at the park and found a dozen of my girlfriends there with cake and presents for me!

When I got to high school, there was a “reputation” about the park, that made us not want to go there after dark. From some of the reviews I read on Google Search, that might still be a problem – with other problems as well. But apparently it is still a family-friendly park, that has added a frisbee golf course (I have no idea what that is!) and walking paths.

Another park we went to occasionally was Tingley Park, or Tingley Field as we called it. I really don’t remember much about it, except that we would go there for baseball games. I really never got interested in baseball, so I’m not sure that sport was why I went there. Probably my parents enjoyed it, so we went. I have one picture of my Grandmother (Granny) and her Uncle Jess, sitting in the bleachers at a baseball game at Tingley Field. (Please see my post of April 7, 2013, titled Uncle Jess) He was a pistol, for sure.

 

 

I’ve also found on Google Search that the Albuquerque Zoo is located within Tingley Park. I remember going to the zoo, but only occasionally. Apparently it is quite a good zoo.

As I looked at Google Search for parks in Albuquerque, there are so many of them that I don’t remember, but then, we’ve been away from there for the 55 years we’ve been married – only back for visits, and parks are not usually on the itinerary.

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A 2016 Dawn Patrol Rendezvous Trip~Part 13

29 Mar

A Slice of Life

Bill Lites

 

Day 13 (Tuesday Oct.11, 2016)
This busy day started out with a visit to the MAPS Air Museum located in North Canton, OH. This museum reminded me a lot of the Valiant Air Command Museum in Titusville. They had many of the same airplanes, engines, and military vehicles that the VAC has.

 

 

The big difference between the two museums, is that all but two of the VAC’s aircraft are beautifully restored and hangered, whereas many of the MAPS aircraft are permanently displayed outside, and are the worse for wear by constant exposure to the weather. Three of the more interesting aircraft at this museum, as far as I was concerned, were their 1908 Martin Glider, their Sopwith Triplane, and their B-26 Marauder.

 


Down the road a few miles I visited the William McKinley Presidential Library and Museum located in Canton, OH. I was amazed at the extent this city has gone to, in honoring their hometown man, William McKinley.

 

There is a huge memorial edifice, as well as the large presidential library. The museum is beautifully laid out on three levels, and shows many different examples of McKinley’s life and his time as President.


Next on the list was a visit to the Canton Classic Car Museum, also located there in Canton. This museum displays some 40+ beautifully restored rare and unusual classic/special interest cars, as well as a large variety of historical automotive memorabilia.

 

 

While I was in Canton, I had Greta direct me to the First Ladies National Historical Site (Museum). I didn’t realize, until informed by the tour guide, that this museum was physically located in the original restored 1841 McKinley residence.

 

 

I was truly impressed with the story of the saving and restoration, of the residence, and all of the information displayed about the First Ladies of our American Presidents. I think DiVoran, or any woman would have enjoyed the tour much more than I did. The decor of the residence and the styles of the time period displayed and referred to, during the tour, I think would be of great interest to most any woman.

 


Heading south on I-77, I was planning to make a short visit at the Schoenbrunn Village, located in New, Philadelphia OH. But when I got there, this early American village looked too spread out, and would have taken way too much time to see it all. I learned from their web site, that the Schoenbrunn Village is a reconstruction of the early Delaware Moravian Village that was started by David Zeisberger in 1772. The current village consists of 17 reconstructed buildings, including Zeisberger’s cabin, his church, and the first village schoolhouse.

 

 

A few miles to the southeast I visited the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum located in Denison, Ohio. This was a very small museum, with local railroad memorabilia and some very nicely restored rolling stock. The museum is one of the only remaining examples, in the nation, of a railroad canteen that reflects its WWII heritage. I learned from their website that the Dennison Depot was built in 1873, and became an important central rail hub for many years.

 

 

During WWII the “Dennison Depot Salvation Army Servicemen’s Canteen” (operating 24/7 from 1942-1946 by some 4000 volunteers), served millions of military service personnel free food and coffee, which eventually earned it the nickname, “Dreamsville, Ohio.”

 

 

My next stop was to visit the Hopalong Cassidy Museum located in Cambridge, Ohio. I had talked to the curator of this museum a few weeks ago, to find out what their hours of operation were. So, I was completely surprised when Greta informed me that I had arrived at the museum location, only to see a burned-out two story building! I asked a lady on the street if that was the museum location, and she informed me that it was, and that the museum had been destroyed by fire just two weeks ago. What a bummer for everyone!

 

 

Next on my list was the National Museum of Cambridge Glass, also located there in Cambridge. The museum displays over 6000 pieces of beautiful classic glassware creations by the Cambridge Glass Company from 1902-1958. There is also a small interpretive area where visitors can see how glass was made; from the gathering and shaping of the glass, to the etching and engraving of the final product.

 

 

Now I headed south a few more miles, to check out the Byesville Coal Mine & Train Museum located in Byesville, Ohio. This was a very small museum (part of the M&P Railway system in 1871), with local railroad memorabilia and a few items of restored rolling stock.

 

 

There was also a monument and memorial to the many Ohio coal miners of the early 1900s to mid-1900s, who filled the coal cars of “The Route of the Black Diamond” trains, and helped put this area of Ohio on the map.

 


Now as I headed west, my next stop was to visit the John & Annie Glenn Historical Site located in new Concorde, Ohio. This small museum consisted of memorabilia from the lives of John & Annie Glenn, displayed in their former residence there in Concorde.

 


After putting all those miles on the rental car today, I finally headed for tonight’s motel located in Zanesville, Ohio. Dinner tonight at the local Cracker Barrel Restaurant, was a serving of their delicious Grilled Rainbow Trout with corn, green beans, and one of their famous buttermilk biscuits, with butter and honey for dessert. Yummm!

 

—–To Be Continued—–

 

 

Mingus Mill

28 Mar

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Mingus Creek Trail, Cherokee, NC

A half-mile north of the Oconaluftee Visitor Center is Mingus Mill. Built in 1886, this historic grist mill uses a water-powered turbine instead of a water wheel to power all of the machinery in the building. Located at its original site, Mingus Mill stands as a tribute to the test of time.

The fairly large building is powered by the water that rushes into the “millrace” from a diversion upstream.  The path leads all the way to where this diversion occurs.  As you walk up the millrace you’ll notice how the wooden planks that makeup the siding have remained firmly in place over the years. Although it was rehabilitated in 1968 by the National Park service, it is still an impressive sight to see.

Memories of New Mexico~Part 5

26 Mar

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

So many memories returning to my mind….where do I start?

Okay, let’s start with some of my first memories – and pictures of our time in New Mexico. Daddy had gone ahead of us (we were living in Dallas, Texas at the time), and purchased a house. Mother had never seen it until we arrived in Albuquerque. I thought it was a neat house, but then that’s all I had known. I never knew what Mother thought about it. But she made it her own, and it was comfortable.

Here I am, with my Mother, in front of our new house,

 

and the house itself.

 

 

From records, it was built in 1940, and we purchased it in 1945. It all looks a bit rugged at that point in time, but my parents worked it well, and it became a thing of beauty.

See that screened-in front porch? My brother and I spent many a summer afternoon out there with our friends. And then we set up cots to sleep on during the summer nights. It was great! I especially remember my best friend coming over and we would play Monopoly all day long, sleep at night out there, then start up the next day. That went on for days….and days…..and days! But it was summer, and we were kids.

Here’s a picture of Bill and me in front of one of the Pampas Grass bushes that grew there.

 

 

Daddy tamed that bush and it prospered beautifully. I especially want you to notice the flagstone sidewalk. I really loved that sidewalk. It was curvy, and really unique. Unfortunately, the city decided each house had to have a concrete sidewalk from the house to a running sidewalk that ran along the street. The city poured that sidewalk, but Daddy had to pay to have the flagstones removed and the straight walk from the house poured. It just wasn’t the same!

 

 

In the background of this picture is a house on the corner. Those of you old enough to remember the Lawrence Welk show on TV, might also remember that he had a dancer, Bobby. I don’t remember the name of his first partner, but his second dance partner, the cute little blond – Cissy – grew up in that house on the corner. Her family owned a dance studio, and all the children were later involved in it. Her brother, John, and I were close in age. So that’s my claim to fame!

Also in the background, behind us in this picture, you can see some fairly flat ground with some spindly trees. That was the start of Bataan Memorial Park, in honor of those from New Mexico who were involved in the Bataan Death March and the battle of Corregidor in World War 2.

Credit Google Search

Google Search

Credit Google Search

 

Unfortunately, back then, it was just a place to go and play. I didn’t understand the significance of it until many years later. The names of those involved are engraved on stones within the park.

 

 

It’s a lush, beautiful park now, and is the site of many gatherings, weddings, etc. It played a bit of a part in our family, as it was where my brother, Bill, took his model airplanes he had built, to fly. Frequently I would accompany him, watch him fly his planes, watch them crash, then he would take them home and fix them up. I think I helped him repair them, but I may have been more of a hindrance than help. At least I don’t remember him chasing me away!

~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

A 2016 Dawn Patrol Rendezvous~Trip Part 12

22 Mar

A Slice of Life

 Bill Lites

 

Day 12 (Monday Oct.10, 2016)
I awoke to another brisk Ohio fall morning of 36° with a high expected today of 60°. I bundled up, and headed southeast to visit my first museum of the day, which was the National Packard Museum located in Warren, OH. I have discovered that quite a few museums are open on Saturdays, but closed Sundays and Mondays. This was the case for this museum. I was not too disappointed about missing a visit to this museum, as I had visited the American Packard Museum in Dayton on the second day of this trip. That’s not to say I would not have enjoyed viewing more beautifully restored early Packard automobiles at this museum.

 

 

Next on the list for today, was a visit to the Ernie Hall Aviation Museum, also located there in Warren. This turned out to be a relatively small museum founded by Ernie C. Hall in the early 1900s. Information on an Ohio Historical Marker indicates that Ernie Hall was a good friend of the Wright Brothers and other early aviation notables.

 

 

His web site says that Ernie Hall holds the distinction of being actively involved in all aspects of aviation longer than any person in the world. What an honor!! His website also says that as a member of the exclusive Early Bird Club, Ernie was one of the many early aviation enthusiasts that helped birth the American aviation industry. He established the Hall Flying School in 1915, and during WWI joined the Army Signal Corps as a flight instructor. It was during this time that Ernie trained many well-known aviation greats, such as Jimmy Doolittle and others, to fly.

 

As I headed back east toward Akron, Ohio I stopped at the Kent University to visit the memorial to the May 4, 1970 shooting of students, by members of the Ohio National Guard. The students were protesting the Nixon Administration’s “Cambodian Campaign” there on campus, when the Guardsmen opened fire, killing 4 students and wounding 9 others.

 

 

Down the road a ways, my plan was to visit the Hale Farm & Village Museum located in Bath, OH. This farm and museum was closed, so it was difficult for me to find out what their main emphasis was. However, I did find out from an Ohio Historical Marker, that the Hale family settled in this area in the early 1800s, and was instrumental in the founding of the Bath Township, also considered part of the “Firelands” (Northwest Territory).

 

 

 

Now I headed south, to visit the Bethlehem Cave & Nativity Museum, located in the Nativity of the Lord Jesus Catholic Church in Akron, OH. A very friendly escort informed me that Father David Halaiko had created the Bethlehem Cave from photographs, and collected many of the memorabilia items on display. Also a number of Father Halaiko’s parishioners had brought back memorabilia items, from their trips to countries all over the world, to add to his display.

 


Next I checked out the Cuyahoga Valley Railroad Station located on the north side of Akron, OH. This is part of the Cuyahoga Valley Railroad Scenic Railroad System that stretches from Independence, OH, through the center of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, to Akron with seven stops at smaller stations along the way.

 

 

 

While researching for this trip on the Internet, under a “List of things to do in Akron Ohio,” the Glendale Cemetery was listed. I wanted to see what was so interesting about this cemetery, so I drove through and took some pictures of some of the stately mausoleums.

 

 

 

This cemetery dates from 1839, and I was amazed at the size and complexity of some of the structures. Many of the mausoleums are modeled after Egyptian, Greek and Roman temples or Gothic churches.

 

 

On the way to the motel, due to road construction, Greta kept directing me in a figure eight of exits/ramps trying to get me on I-77 north. That was really frustrating! I finally stopped, got out my Ohio map, and worked out a way to get to the motel area, without taking the route that Greta was insisting upon. That made for an extremely long day, before I could stop, relax, and call DiVoran, to tell her about the adventures of my day.

 

(This cartoon from the Internet expresses just how I felt!)

By then it was way past time to heat up the leftover Baby Back Ribs, sweet potato, and green beans for another delicious Applebee’s dinner. Yummm again!

 

—–To Be Continued—–

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