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19 Oct

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Romans 8:26

Holy Spirit Prayer

Scribe-DiVoran

Painting by DiVoran Lites

My Dearly Beloved,

Holy Spirit knows the way.

He will teach us how to pray.

Praying in us every day.

Prayers forever, here to stay. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Hush and Listen

12 Oct

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Picture from Amazon Books

A teacher once told her class that research shows women need to speak 30,000 words a day. Some of us may do that and way over and some of us may not speak a word all day long. Sometimes in my life I have been more contemplative than talkative, but now I’m older and probably talk too much.  Of course, with our Covid quarantine many of us talk less because of the isolation, though we can always get on the phone or write if we need company.  

Lately, I’ve been paying attention to the idea of listening more than talking. And the idea has given me room for thought and improvement in my prayer life. 

I’ve been reading a National Bestselling Non-Fiction book called Merle’s Door, Lessons from a Freethinking Dog by Ted Kerasote. The dog Merle shows high intelligence and discernment. He is also well and reasonably trained by Ted, the master he adores, and boy can that dog communicate. 

The author learns how the dog is affected by everything around him. Merle uses his tail, eyes, ears, and nose to communicate with his human buddy. Here’s something Ted wrote in the first few pages:

 “His deep brown eyes looked at me with luminous appreciation and said, ‘You need a dog, and I’m it.’

Unsettled by his uncanny read of me—I had been looking for a dog for over a year—I gave him a cordial pat and replied, “Good dog.”

His tail beat steadily, and he didn’t move, his eyes still saying, “You need a dog.” 

Ted Kerasote is an A1 listener. 

Well, come on, I’m ready for my treats.

Thea, my Tuxedo cat, and I have many ways of communication. She likes the sound of my voice and the way my breath smells. Usually, she leads the conversations by tone of meow and tells me what she needs. She has a questioning voice, an emergency voice and a happy voice. She also purrs, to show how happy she is.  She strokes my sandals with her cheeks leaving pheromones that broadcast that I am hers.

Lately, I’ve been slowing down my pell-mell personality, and it’s delightful to see, hear, and acknowledge things I would usually have over-looked because of my impatience.   

Now I will use that realization to train myself to listen more. One person I must hear from is our Heavenly Father-Jesus Christ-Holy Spirit. For most of the years that I have been a Christian, which is for most of my life, I have not listened to him as well as I might have.  I read the Bible and accepted its precepts. I made notes of what other people said I should do and say. I searched my soul and engaged in long sessions of worry/praying to untangle my troubles. 

One day I asked our preacher’s sweet wife a question. I’ll always recall how she pointed up with her index finger then arched it down toward her heart. She said, “Ask God and wait to get His answer. He may speak in a still small voice, or illuminate a scripture, or speak through another person or event.  

 It took many more years for me to even begin to understand her simple explanation. I always thought I should fend for myself in the worry business.  

One year we had family problems and day after day and night after night I thought about them and tried to solve them. Then one day I read Isaiah 55:8. “For My thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord. 

The light went on. If I wanted God’s point of view I would have to stop thinking about any problem and wait for His answer. It didn’t matter if the problem was large or small. It didn’t matter if the wait was long or short.  He illuminated this scripture: “And if anyone longs to be wise, ask God for wisdom and he will give it! He won’t see your lack of wisdom as an opportunity to scold you over your failures, but he will overwhelm your failures with his generous grace.” James 1:5.”

Believe me, It works, and it makes life more peaceful, and productive. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Words of Advice

5 Oct

My Take

DiVoran Lites

This came to my inbox from a friend and was so freeing that i wanted to share it with our readers.

Words of advice to Old Friends 

Many of us are between 65 and death, i.e. old. A friend sent me this excellent list for aging . . . and I have to agree it’s good advice to follow. The person who sent this hi-lighted #19.

1. It’s time to use the money you saved up. Use it and enjoy it. Don’t just keep it for those who may have no notion of the sacrifices you made to get it. Remember there is nothing more dangerous than a son or daughter-in-law with big ideas for your hard-earned capital. Warning: This is also a bad time for investments, even if it seems wonderful or fool-proof. They only bring problems and worries. This is a time for you to enjoy some peace and quiet.

Photo by Monica Silvestre on Pexels.com

2. Stop worrying about the financial situation of your children and grandchildren, and don’t feel bad spending your money on yourself. Youve taken care of them for many years, and you’ve taught them what you could. You gave them an education, food, shelter and support. The responsibility is now theirs to earn their own money.

3. Keep a healthy life, without great physical effort. Do moderate exercise (like walking every day), eat well and get your sleep. It’s easy to become sick, and it gets harder to remain healthy That is why you need to keep yourself in good shape and be aware of your medical and physical needs. Keep in touch with your doctor, do tests even when you’re feeling well. Stay informed.

4. Always buy the best, most beautiful items for your significant other. The key goal is to enjoy your money with your partner One day one of you will miss the other, and the money will not provide any comfort then, enjoy it together.

5. Don’t stress over the little things. Like paying a little extra on price quotes. You’ve already overcome so much in your life. You have good memories and bad ones, but the important thing is the present. Don’t let the past drag you down and don’t let the future frighten you. Feel good in the now. Small issues will soon be forgotten.

6. Regardless of age, always keep love alive. Love your partner, love life, love your family, love your neighbor and remember: “A man is not old as long as he has intelligence and affection.”

Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

7. Be proud, both inside and out. Don’t stop going to your hair salon or barber, do your nails, go to the dermatologist and the dentist, keep your perfumes and creams well stocked. When you are well-maintained on the outside, it seeps in, making you feel proud and strong.

8. Don’t lose sight of fashion trends for your age, but keep your own sense of style. There’s nothing worse than an older person trying to wear the current fashion among youngsters. You’ve developed your own sense of what looks good on you – keep it and be proud of it. It’s part of who you are.

9. ALWAYS stay up-to-date. Read newspapers, watch the news. Go online and read what people are saying. Make sure you have an active email account and try to use some of those social networks. You’ll be surprised what old friends you’ll meet. Keeping in touch with what is going on and with the people you know is important at any age.

10. Respect the younger generation and their opinions. They may not have the same ideals as you, but they are the future, and will take the world in their direction. Give advice, not criticism, and try to remind them that yesterday’s wisdom still applies today.

11. Never use the phrase: “In my time.” Your time is now. As long as you’re alive, you are part of this time. You may have been younger, but you are still you now, having fun and enjoying life.

12. Some people embrace their golden years, while others become bitter and surly. Life is too short to waste your days on the latter. Spend your time with positive, cheerful people, it’ll rub off on you and your days will seem that much better. Spending your time with bitter people will make you older and harder to be around.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

13. Do not surrender to the temptation of living with your children or grandchildren (if you have a financial choice, that is) Sure, being surrounded by family sounds great, but we all need our privacy They need theirs and you need yours. If you’ve lost your partner (our deepest condolences), then find a person to move in with you and help out. Even then, do so only if you feel you really need the help or do not want to live alone.

14. Don’t abandon your hobbies. If you don’t have any, make new ones. You can travel, hike, cook, read, dance You can adopt a cat or a dog, grow a garden, play cards, checkers, chess, dominoes, golf. You can paint, volunteer or just collect certain items. Find something you like and spend some real time having fun with it.

15. Even if you don’t feel like it, try to accept invitations. Baptisms, graduations, birthdays, weddings, conferences. Try to go. Get out of the house, meet people you haven’t seen in a while, experience something new (or something old). But don’t get upset when you’re not invited. Some events are limited by resources, and not everyone can be hosted. The important thing is to leave the house from time to time. Go to museums, go walk through a field. Get out there.

Photo by Robin Schreiner on Pexels.com

16. Be a conversationalist. Talk less and listen more. Some people go on and on about the past, not caring if their listeners are really interested. That’s a great way of reducing their desire to speak with you. Listen first and answer questions, but don’t go off into long stories unless asked to. Speak in courteous tones and try not to complain or criticize too much unless you really need to. Try to accept situations as they are. Everyone is going through the same things, and people have a low tolerance for hearing complaints. Always find some good things to say as well.

17. Pain and discomfort go hand in hand with getting older. Try not to dwell on them but accept them as a part of the cycle of life we’re all going through. Try to minimize them in your mind. They are not who you are, they are something that life added to you. If they become your entire focus, you lose sight of the person you used to be.

18. If you’ve been offended by someone – forgive them. If you’ve offfended someone – apologize. Don’t drag around resentment with you. It only serves to make you sad and bitter. It doesn’t matter who was right. Someone once said: “Holding a grudge is like taking poison and expecting the other person to die.” Don’t take that poison. Forgive, forget and move on with your life.

19. If you have a strong belief, savor it. But don’t waste your time trying to convince others. They will make their own choices no matter what you tell them, and it will only bring you frustration. Live your faith and set an example. Live true to your beliefs and let that memory sway you.

20. Laugh. Laugh A LOT. Laugh at everything. Remember, you are one of the lucky ones. You managed to have a life, a long one. Many never get to this age, never get to experience a full life. But you did. So what’s not to laugh about? Find the humor in your situation.

Photo by Maksim Goncharenok on Pexels.com

21. Take no notice of what others say about you and even less notice of what they might be thinking. They’ll do it anyway, and you should have pride in yourself and what you’ve achieved Let them talk and don’t worry. They have no idea about your history, your memories and the life you’ve lived so far. There’s still much to be written, so get busy writing and don’t waste time thinking about what others might think. Now is the time to be at rest, at peace and as happy as you can be!

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Skunk!

28 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Some time ago, our ten-year-old son had a friend over, and the boys went into the woods to play. We appreciated having the jungle like woods begin at the end of our sidewalk. From there, we took long walks in the woods with children and dogs. We were never afraid for the children when they got old enough to go out there with buddies. After all, ten-year-old boys all over America roamed the woods and deserts building forts and climbing trees. In those days and for centuries, the country was a safe haven for most children most of the time. 

That day the boys came running into the house. My son yelled, “Mom, Mom.” I looked at the other boy. His eyeballs seemed to quiver. The big dog had come in too, somewhat subdued.  They didn’t have to tell me what they were carrying on about; my nose told me. SKUNK! They knew to stay clear of that black and white kitty, but there he was stuck in a steel trap. I had to see if there was anything we could do to free poor Pepe Le Pew. We didn’t want to touch the trap, so we found a big heavy stick and pried the trap open with it. The skunk never did rise to his front legs and spray us; he just sauntered away.  

To keep any other wildlife from getting caught, we suspended the trap by its chain on a big wooden stick. The boys carried it from each end, looking proud as if they had done something brave. We put the trap in the garage. It stayed there for a few weeks.

Then one day, our boy came home from playing in the neighborhood. He told us one of the teens up the street had complained that we had stolen his trap. 

We didn’t know who the trap belonged to and didn’t care until our son came home from playing in the neighborhood and told me the owner had accused us of stealing the contraption. Not being a thief or wanting to be called one, I put the trap back on the stick and our son, and I walked it over to the teen’s house. The garage door was up, and the fellow happened to be standing at a bench, working on something.  He didn’t get a chance to say anything.

Remembering the poor little skunk, a wave of fury overtook me, and I let the steel trap clatter onto the cement floor.  We turned and walked the short distance home. Not a word had been spoken.   

The young man grew up to become a personality in the community, and we remained good friends with the rest of the family. I guess it’s about time now for me to forgive the kid he once was. I never thought of that until right now. As far as I know, he never set another trap in those woods.

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Transplants

21 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Pixabay

In 1965, when Bill got a job at the Kennedy Space Center, we moved with our two children 2,564.5 miles from the Los Angeles area to Titusville, Florida. Fortunately, our few possessions went in a moving van paid for by Bill’s company. 

Florida was to become a whole new adventure for all of us. One of our first experiences occurred when we had not yet reached our destination. 

Most of the journey from Orlando to Titusville was on an uneven asphalt road through a Tarzan-like jungle.  What we didn’t know was that we’d soon be passing over a cement bridge that covered the expansive St John’s River marsh. Lightning crackled, and thunder shook our world.Our car’s headlights were the only bits of light in sight. We hadn’t seen where the bridge began, and once we were on it, we couldn’t see where it ended. To increase the sense of dread, frogs began to pop up all around our now creeping vehicle. We knew we were squashing them under our tires, but there was nothing we could do. Fortunately, the children didn’t wake up until the next morning at the motel. Bill reported to work at the space center the next day, and the children and I went out to explore.

Pixabay

Three weeks later, we found a fine new house and moved into it. Once again, we were inundated with frogs. This time they splacked themselves on our glass patio doors and got busy gorging on the moths and mosquitos that were attracted to the light inside the house. We had begun to look up things and talk to neighbors about the wild-life and found that these were Green Tree Frogs. We could see that they had gold stripes running along their sides. I fancied that it was real gold because God likes to make our world as beautiful and authentic as possible. 

The frogs didn’t bother us. We got used to their sounds. After a rain, we could hear them out in the woods singing. They had sopranos, tenors, and bass singers. It started like a concert and ended like one, too. 

One evening we had folks over for supper, and the gentleman of the pair wanted to go out the patio doors into the back yard to look around. We let him out, but when he returned and tried to slide the door open again, a good-sized frog plopped down onto his head. I imagine the frog was as startled as the man. But I was embarrassed! Anyway, he brushed the frog off, and it all became a funny memory. 

For a while, people who move to Florida are called transplants. People who have homes here and homes in other states get the name of snow-birds because they come here to stay warm.  If they enjoy Florida, they make friends with the “Crackers,” that are already hereReal crackers, though, are families who have have been here for at least five generations or longer. I love my native friends and feel many bonds with them after all these years. Thank you, Lord, for transplanting us.

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Juveniles

14 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

We live on the brink of a wildlife refuge and have for 54 years. After we were here for a while, we knew we wanted to use our back yard and an attached half-acre for a bird sanctuary. 

We did some reading about it, and the most important thing to remember was not to use a poisonous weed killer in the yard. The popular brand does have some elements of poison in it even though their label says otherwise. We had more to learn, such as keeping the birdbath water fresh and putting out enough food for the small birds. The larger ones must shift for themselves. We see to it that there is plenty of seed in the hanging feeders, and God has provided plenty of hiding and nesting places. 

DiVoran, Our Porch

We love to watch wildlife from the porch or the dining room window. 

A few days ago, a noisy blue jay landed in a tree and gave me a talking-to. His bright, sharp voice pierced the air.  After a few seconds of speaking harshly to me, he swooped onto the bird feeder. His head ducked three times. That meant he got three tiny millet seeds. He flapped up to a high limb and pecked at the seeds to get the hulls off. 

The exact thing happened the next morning, and I wondered what I had done to offend him.  His white feathers looked whiter than older birds,’ and his neck was smaller than an adult bird. I concluded that he had come in the big batch of various baby birds that hatched last spring and was now beginning to sow his oats as teenagers sometimes do.  

Photo by DiVoran

Photo by DiVoran

  I had another glimpse of the beautiful bird early this morning. I think of it as a scrappy male, but maybe it is an insistent female. Either way, it and a squirrel had a confrontation over who would use the bath first. It was like a dance. When the squirrel headed for the bath for a drink of water, the Blue Jay flew a few feet away and landed on the fence. The squirrel raced back to its tree and sped up and down the trunk, and the juvenile came back and finally enjoyed his bath. 

Florida Squirrel Pixabay

We are so grateful to live close to wildlife. When we watch from the porch, small new actions thrill us. Our cat, Thea, is on the job for hours every day. She’s there to protect us from lizards, frogs, squirrels, birds, and our black racer, Blacky, who gets the most prolonged stares and the most cat-chatter. She does her job well.   

Today rain came down in bucketsful accompanied by thunder and lightning. We’ve had a lot of rain this year, blessedly no hurricanes yet. The juvenile Jay Bird came back in the storm for something more to eat. He screeched in his usually brazen way and flew from limb to limb.  He came back to the branch and issued a soft sound I’d never heard from a jay before. It sounded like three scared calls (for mommy.) I no longer think of him as reckless. Maybe he wants attention like anyone else. May he have a long and happy life and come back often.      

           

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Book Worm

7 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Pixabay

My husband (of 63 years today) and I went to Europe about twenty years ago. I knew I’d need something good to read on the plane, so on the way to the airport, I rushed into a grocery store here in Titusville and bought a fat paperback for $15.00. What an outrageous amount of money for a paperback book! I thought it was a romance, and in a way, it was. The romance, however, seemed to be more about raising and processing opium in plantation days in a far-away country than smooching. I discovered I didn’t want to read it, but I did because it’s a long way across the pond, and I couldn’t sleep. 

It’s too bad I didn’t have a Kindle or any audiobooks on a digital phone as I do now. You can have a gazillion books on your phone or pad or whatever, and you can take them everywhere you go.  Many of my friends major in reading that way, and I think they are smart to do it. But for some reason, I can’t shake the desire to have a book in my hands. I even paint handmade bookmarks as a hobby. I paint them and lose them. The library called me once to tell me I had left one in a book and did I want them to hold it for me. I said yes, but to my embarrassment, I forgot to ask for it when I went there again.  I do have one friend that hasn’t gone digital, and we have a delightful time together exchanging books. 

Now, I don’t keep a whole lot of books, even though I do have a big bookcase and a couple of small ones. But I have a working plan that utilizes the public library where I have been going for 55 years. When we first came to town, it was in a small building, but since then, we have newer ones.  I thank the U. S. Government for free libraries.

I’ve always liked family stories and romances, as well as non-fiction. It bothers me, though, when people say, “Pretty soon, we aren’t going to use paper anymore because everything will be digital.” I don’t think that is panning out the way people thought it would, and there’s probably more use of paper than ever in history because it’s so easy to print things out and spread them around.  

The Bible and I are old friends, and I like to read it every day. Sometimes I go to Bible Gateway on my computer or phone to look something up or read a passage. Gateway has audio bibles, too.  They seem to have all the translations ever produced. I like the variety and understanding that comes from that. 

I’m appalled at the COVID pandemic, but in one way, I have benefitted by having all the time in the world to read. Also, slowing way down has had a a healing effect on me. 

Maybe I’ll talk about this subject some more. I think I like to write about reading as much as I like to read. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

The Storms of Life

31 Aug

A Prayer

My Take

DiVoran Lites

The Storms of Life

Dear Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,

We are your beloved children from now and through eternity

Your loving care is an umbrella to keep our spirits up.

You empower us to follow your lead.

You are Divine Encourager,

Comforter,

Spirit of God. 

Thank you for the delightful times you give us.

Thank you for always listening and always answering.

You hydrate our souls

While you protect us through the storms of life.

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

My Boxes

24 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

My Boxes by Thea

Scribe DiVoran

When I first came to live with mama ad papa, my kittens and I had been at a foster home. I loved my kittens, but as they grew and played harder and harder, I got more and more tired. One day me and my kittens were put in carriers and took to SPCA. That’s where people go to find beautiful cats and dogs to take home and love. 

I don’t remember how many kittens I have or what colors they are.  Mama likes to tell me stories about them. One day she counted the little pink bumps on my tummy, and because I had six of them under my white fur, she says I had six kittens. It’s just make-believe. She tells me I had six different colors of babies, too. Three were girls, and three were boys. I had two calicos, three tigers, and one tuxedo that looked like me. I wish I could see them again, but I am happy where I am, so it would have to be just a visit. I wouldn’t want to go back to the foster home because the people there are so busy they don’t have time to pay attention to one cat. When the place I lived didn’t want me anymore because I was going to have kittens, the people at the SPCA did so many things for me. They fixed me so I wouldn’t have any more kittens. And they put a chip about the size of a grain of rice under my skin so if I got lost they could find me. Also they gave me shots to keep me healthy. It all hurt for just a minute, but mama said they were good things. For some reason, she only paid five dollars instead of $85 for me, I wonder why.

Now I live in a house with three litter boxes all to myself. One thing about me is that I am a long cat. I don’t look like it curled up in mama’s chair.  When I laid on the floor mama measured me. She said that from the tip of one paw stretched out in front and one stretched out in back, I measured three feet long. She thinks that is the reason my waste falls out of the litterboxes. Scratching on the wall or the door or any other place doesn’t hide it. I am embarrassed and sorry.  

One place that is good and big is mama’s bathtub. It’s easy to clean too, but she decided I couldn’t use it. First, she put orange peels in the bottom. No cat I know likes the smell of orange peels. Later, she put a layer of water at the bottom of the tub. Every day I put my paws on the rim and look in to see if the water is still there. 

The other three boxes are on the porch, and in the studio. But I still liked mama’s pretty bathroom best, so I used the bathroom floor. Mama stepped in my water in her stocking feet. She didn’t like that. 

Once she got that book about Decoding Your Cat and read that cats already had a lot of anxiety and that it didn’t help at all to punish and be mean, and decided not to be harsh with me. Some people are very harsh if their cats go outside the little boxes, sometime they get sent away somewhere because their owner can’t figure out how to make them use the sanitation that is here for them. Mama read that big enough and clean enough boxes can help a lot. Litter boxes must be completely emptied and washed with unscented soap. For one cat once a month is enough, unless it is a very messy cat. The more cats you have the more cleaning you have to do. 

So now, mama is trying harder to keep my boxes as clean as can be, and I am happy. She’s going to get a big enough plastic box, so I don’t have to drop my litter onto the floor.  

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Treats and Feets

17 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Treats and Feets

By Thea

Scribe: DiVoran

One thing I do for fun is begging for treats. They are better than my regular food. I must start letting Mama know what time it is. I feel in my bones that it’s time for treats. I grab the side of her computer chair with my claws to remind her. She says, “Just a minute,” and gently brushes me away. “No, it’s not time.” She says. I lie down close to the chair, hoping she won’t roll over my tail when she shoves off. Sometimes I start to meow pleadingly, but she doesn’t like too much of that. She says it breaks her thinking, but I never broke anything in my life.

After a very long time, she gets up and walks to the kitchen. I run ahead, then stop and look back with my round, yellow eyes.  Mama sprinkles the treats on a soft, red throw, and I hunt for each one in its soft folds. Mama tells me that when I first came, she started giving me treats at seven P.M., but now I get them at four-thirty, cause I know that’s when I’m supposed to. 

After I eat my treats, we play with a soft fat string on a wand. The mouse came off, but a knot is elegant.  I run after it once and roll down and catch it. I hold it to my pretty white tummy with all sixteen claws. When I want Mama to wave the wand again, I let go. I play lying down Here’s a picture of my feet, aren’t they beautiful?  

Music for cats.

Mama is reading this book from the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. It’s a good book. She got it at the public library. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

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