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Letters from Mother Part 16

13 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

September 21, 1983

Last week we went to Dave’s on Wednesday to get the boat and motor on its way home. Lowell and Helen came here on Saturday and spent the weekend with us. She is a nice lady, and we enjoyed her. I was kind of tired, though. It seems like we had been with folks and doing things for a long time.

Ivan and Lowell, Brothers as young men 

Helen has been a widow for twenty-two years, making her living and socializing with other businesswomen. She says this is a whole new life for her. She’s trying hard to please Lowell, waits on him, worries about him, and even hopes to make him look better with a diet. She would marry him in a minute, I think, but he’s running scared and peeks out like a little rabbit, as Dad says. My neighbor, Ruth, said they should live together for a year because people change after six months of living together. Ruth is divorced, while Lowell lost his wife to cancer. 

I hope he goes slow. They both have a lot of adjusting to do. 

Baking a Cake-Photo credit Pixabay

                                                                                            

I’ve gotten myself in trouble a couple of times lately. Ruth brought me a gift-it was a chain cake-I think that’s what it is called. You take some sourdough or raised dough starter, something like that, in a bowl and the recipe and give it to a friend. It rises for seven days, during which time you add sugar and stuff. On the last day, you bake it for forty-five minutes in a Bundt pan, and it’s like a fruit cake. I told her I didn’t want it because I couldn’t remember to do all that stuff for seven days. (Besides, what if I got a cake from everyone? Ha! Ha!). She was surprised at my refusal, but we’re still friends.

Photo credit Pixabay

                                                                    

Then yesterday, I helped with the opportunity table at the Church Woman’s Association luncheon, and when I saw two idols on the table, bells went off in my head; I got goosebumps and went to the leader I was working with. I said, “Those idols have got to go; we can’t have them for sale at a church bazaar. Who do you suppose brought them in?”

 Well, she whisked them into a shoebox and placed it face down on a bench. It seems her husband had brought them to her from Korea years ago, and she had wanted to get rid of them ever since. That’s the way it is with Christians because our guide, the Bible, says not to worship idols, and we take that to mean not to have them around.  The devil loves them. We don’t.  

Last week, when we went to David’s to get the boat and trailer, it had fallen, and it took the men twenty-two hours of labor and one hundred dollars worth of parts to get the boat and motor on its way home. 


That’s all for now, folks.

Love,

Mom

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother episode 15

6 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

September, 1983

Dear Ones, 

Well, it’s finally cool after one more very hot and humid day. Dad went to San Diego with Dave and a friend to hunt doves and pigeons. I hope they don’t meet up with rattlesnakes this time. The men hunt in a field outside the city of Mexicali. It’s only about ten miles across the border, but it’s quite a way over there from Bonita, where Dave lives. Last week when Dave hunted, he was searching through the tall grass for a dove he had shot when he almost stepped on a large rattlesnake. He shot the snake with the gun he had on hand. It turned out to be two rattlers. One had ten rattles; the other had eight.  He skinned one and left the other. He nailed the skin to a workbench and salted it, planning to give it to his hunting buddy for a snakeskin belt for his wife. I have forgotten what the belts cost in stores, but it’s a lot. 

2021:

(Authentic snakeskin is rare.  Handbags can run as high as $15,000USD, while snakeskin boots average about $2000. The delicate nature of the skin and the level of workmanship that goes into assembling an item adds to its cost.)

Snakeskin-Photo Credit Pixabay

                                                                                 Before Dad left with Dave, I made a long list of things I wanted to do while he was away. I got quite a bit done, but not the things I planned. I started catching up on my bookwork, and five hours later, I was finished recording and keeping track of all transactions from our summer’s adventures

Tom and Betty, around the corner, brought me a slip of paper and an ad for a free painting, drawing, and sketching class at the college, so I went to Palomar at San Marcos-next town east of here. I went to class and sat in from nine to twelve. 

Photo Credit Pixabay

We did a lot of sketching of a slim young lady in a bikini. Our teacher told us to draw her in three minutes, two minutes, then thirty seconds, and next, we drew her in five minutes, and then half an hour. She held each pose as long as he said to. She took different graceful poses, almost as though she was dancing. That took some concentration and practice! 

Three or four of us were first-timers and as the 20 or so students were in various stages of learning the teacher wasn’t after perfection. I liked it very much and felt more relaxed than I had at our all-day Salton Sea workshops. We each paid fifteen dollars to the model and five dollars for the campus health insurance.  Not free as they had said, but worth it. 

Love Mother 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother 14

30 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

September 12, 1983

Dear ones,

We’re sitting in the master bedroom where the air conditioner is. I’ve been paying bills, and that once lovely balance is beginning to look like a grain silo with a slow leak. We have our tax estimates to pay and car insurance. No problem, it’s done. Just that we did well by renting out the house while we traveled, now it’s time to catch up.

 I’m including a photo of the four pictures that I painted up in Washington State. The two on the right were from Elsie Delp, the teacher in Hadlock. The two on the left came from Liz Duval’s workshops. She has taught for 25 years. (Pictures lost.)

  Before we got back to Los Angeles, we had a hard time keeping the truck running as we drove up over the high range of mountains.  Your Dad thought it might be the high altitude affecting the carburetor. Then it was an hour and a half of bumper-to-bumper driving getting through L.A. Dad got tired, and so did I. and Susan came to the house Saturday, and Dave and Dad took the carburetor off and cleaned it, then the truck ran fine. 

Dad’s not sure it’s o. k. but he wants to go to Salton Sea to get the boat. The trailer is broken down, and Dave was to weld it. But your Dad was worried about how the truck would pull the boat over the Sierras to Salton Sea.  I think I would prefer to stay home. If it’s between 90 and 100 degrees here, it’s bound to be sweltering in the desert. 

Photo Credit Pixabay

Dave sold his dune buggy and got a 13 ft boat with a 15 H.P. motor for duck hunting in Mexico. 

Christ and Jen have an assortment of plastic, heeled shoes in various colors for school. Have you seen that kind of shoe in Florida? They look like they will wear a long time if they don’t get scratched. 

Thanks for having letters here when we got home. It sounds like you are encouraged with your writing. I pray you will have great pleasure with it and some income too. My prayer is not limited. I only ask that you might publish something like Gone with the Wind.

I saw the movie “Tammy Tell Me True”  T. V. I guess I like it as well as you like, “The Wizard of Oz.” It reminded me of a night when grandson Dab was just a little shaver, and I took him to a drive-in movie. He discovered the full moon that night. I shed a few tears, remembering.

Well, I have a chicken in the refrigerator, and someone has to cook it. Guess who? 

Love you Lots

Mother and Dad

Dave and Susan each made the same remark about my paintings. They individually said, “I’m impressed.”  

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother 13

23 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Dear DiVoran,

I still want to carpet the house. If you come out, we could decide on what’s good. Is there any news about your coming to California?

We’re home, and the excitement is over for now, and I don’t seem to have a lot to say. Friday, the day before the Labor Day weekend, we had a wild ride down from Mt. Shasta and up into the Sierras. The traffic was so bad with big trucks everywhere and me not driving because I had a nervous stomach and a headache. Ivan had to drive most of the way.

Mount Shasta Pixabay

We stayed put in a motel Saturday, Sunday, and Monday and came down off the mountains on Tuesday. We have one more full day of driving, probably on Friday. 

I’ve been thinking about the songs you wanted. Maybe someday after I get home and unpacked, I’ll record them for you on my little cassette. Those were from the days before television, and some go further back. “Dutchman, Dutchman, will you marry me. How could I marry such a little girl when I have no shoes to put on? So down to the store she did go … is one I remember.  

Oh, one more thing, Mt Shasta was fantastically gorgeous. It was raining the first day and cleared the second. The mountain just outside Jerry’s front door had a new coat of snow, and the very top was outlined in pure white in a 3-D fashion against the blue, blue sky that you remember from Colorado. 

It was so cool and fresh and breathtaking. I called everyone’s attention to it, and Jerry said, I guess I get so busy I take it for granted. 

He carries the greatest load of responsibility where electrical power is concerned of anyone I know. He drinks lots of coffee and smokes. He has no contact with church things. I haven’t been around so many non-Christians in a long time. But at least there were no idols above the bed we slept in.  They just don’t know what they are missing. 
“Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so.” Loves us all. 

Lots of Love and kisses,

Mother and Dad 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Shasta

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother 12

16 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

September 6, 1983

Dear ones,

This day in 1957, you and Bill have been married twenty-six years. You share this anniversary day with your grandmother and granddad and Grandmother’s sister, Helen, and her husband, Ray.

Photo credit Pixabay

We arrived safely at Helen and Ray’s. Ray and your dad have gone to get repair parts so that Ivan can fix their toilet. As you know, he does things like this for people wherever he visits. We had a long weekend up at Ernie and Audrey’s place above Sonora and Twain Heart in the high Sierras. You’ll recall that Ernie has been Ivan’s best friend since they were boys back in Canon City. Dad got a lot of things done for their house and grounds and loved doing it. They put R-30 insulation in the eaves of the attic room and repaired three door locks. They also got the shower fixed. The bathroom upstairs is a shower with a 2×4 frame around it, but there is no wall yet. We call out: “Lady in the showe,” when we go up there, and the guys respond: “we’ll be right up.” 

Photo credit Pixabay

They brought a gramma and grandpa with them and their great-granddaughter, Zoe. Everyone was either eating and drinking or thinking about eating and drinking. 

It wasn’t a bad weekend/slumber party. I especially enjoyed Zoe. It was a joy to take her for a walk in her stroller; everything is exciting to a baby that age. We communicated with grunts and groans and later did some finger painting.  Yes, I cleaned it up when we were finished. 

Now back to Ray and Helen. Ray is so very tired; they shopped for lumber and stuff for your dad’s jobs.

Our visit with Mary and Jerry was nice. We had corned beef and cabbage again. We had it at Audrey’s too, but we didn’t tell Mary. She also got a big ham and cooked it one night, and the next night she got a turkey from the deli, all baked and ready to eat.  All delicious. 

Oh, yes, I am skipping around a lot because a lot is going on. We went to a barbeque. They served a delicious salad from a large trash bag with a rubber-gloved hand. There were shredded cucumbers in it, and it was nice. We chose our tomatoes, cucumbers, and onions. They also dipped the roasting ears into a big pan of melted margarine when they were done. We had cantaloupes, watermelon, and Crenshaw melons. I thought they had some very good ideas.

Helen’s so pleased to have us share the load for a while. It gives her a break from her immediate care of Ray. She loves following Ivan around and handing him things.  They have been good friends since they were born. Helen is Ivan’s and Lowell’s aunt, which means their mother, Marie, was the daughter of Helen’s mother. Figure that one if you can. 

Well, I’ve put my painting aside for now. Dad built a rack up and the shelf in the back of the truck. I’ve been crocheting pillow tops for Lowell’s two bar stools.

Lowell and his friend another Helen went to Canon City to see your grandmother; then he told Aunt Helen that Grandmother hasn’t been feeling well and hasn’t slept lying down for a long time. 

Guess I’ll close for now and think of more to say in the morning. 

Love you,

Mother

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother 11

9 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

September 1, 1983

Photo credit Pixabay

Dear ones,

We’re at Mary and Jerry’s. Dad has gone hunting, and I’ve written one letter to Ivan Dab for his birthday. We had a good trip, with no problems. Thank you for writing us such a nice long letter. DiVoran it is so nicely written and so interesting. I’m a bit late with writing this time due to traveling.

We were so worried when the storm Barry came so close to you, and we kept track of it as it moved on by. 

Photo credit Pixabay

Billy’s clothes sound nice, and he sounds alive and well. Guess Renie’s back in school now, and things are getting all settled to a routine. Bet you’ll be thankful for some cool weather when it comes.

Mary’s house seems big, and she seems to be more organized this time. I’m anxious to get on home to warm weather.

Hope you and Bill have a lovely anniversary as usual. 

We Love you,

Mother and Dad

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother 10

2 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

August 10, 1983

Dear Ones,

Well, I finally settled down to write, but I suspect it will be a quicky. Judy arrived on Friday, and we’ve been having a good time doing all the things we did last summer. I sat on my rock at the beach today and took a picture of the big tree and roots I mentioned last week.

Judy, Smithy, and Waunita went to Victoria yesterday, it was warm and sunny, and they had a good time.

Photo credit Pixabay

 Ivan and I kept the place running. I did laundry at Waunitas and then studied my notes and some other books about painting. I am trying to learn about glazing and scumbling by tomorrow. I was supposed to learn it last week, but I got behind when I tried to free-hand draw the fishing shacks and didn’t catch up. So the picture of Paris in the rain looks like Paris in the rain, but I’m not sure I like it, and I feel quite distressed. Most of the other students were quick enough to do it. Maybe they know some things I don’t. Anyway, tomorrow is painting day. 

Photo credit Pixabay

Smithy sold his big old caterpillar for 15,00 or 17,00. He won’t be using it for the campground anymore. I guess he has dug up and moved all the dirt he wanted to move.

Pauline and her husband J. Y. arrived yesterday as they do every summer. They’ll be here for two months. J.Y. and another man took out two fishing boats, so we’ll have fresh fish for dinner when they get back. 

Photo credit Pixabay

I loved hearing about the peacocks and everything else at Deleon Springs State Park. I remembered that a lizard dropped from a palm tree onto my head, but I also remember swimming in the spring and thinking about Ponce de Leon telling people this water would make us live forever. I know I felt very healthy after swimming at the spring. Bet I would be even warmer in July than November. 

Photo credit Pixabay

I’d love to have lunch with you and your friend when we come again.  Has she found a car she wants yet? That seems like a job for a man. In our family, it has always been for men to decide about cars.

Thank you for your compliment about writing. You are just saying that, so I’ll become all flowery of speech and continue to “go for it” language-wise. But it is fun and goes along with observations for painting. 

Yes, I think I’ve read Daddy Longlegs. Perhaps there was a movie by that name. Anyhow it sounds familiar and good.  I remember The Egg and I from the old books too.

Dad brought in the last of the crab. Come on over for supper.

Adios again,

Love, Mother

It’s getting cooler; time to close the door and take a nap, may need the heater on or the electric blanket to sleep on. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother 9

26 Jul

My Take

DiVoran Lites

August 1, 1983

Dear Ones,

Well now, I don’t know when I wrote to you last. It’s a cloudy day here after a weekend of hot sunny days. Waunita and I wear short pants and sleeveless shirts to try and stay cool. Description: Hiking, People, Sea, Relaxation, Women, Holiday, Walk

Photo credit Pixabay

We went to the beach on Saturday and Sunday. Sister Judy is here with us now. It has been a long time since she has seen our brother Smithy. He was almost grown-up when she was born. I prayed for a baby sister, and the Lord answered my prayer, but Smithy being a young man, didn’t seem to take much interest in her.

Photo credit Pixabay

The first day, we went down the trail through the trees and the ferns. The bank at the water’s edge had worn away some. As we came out to the water, we had to hold onto the smaller trees while we carefully made our way down what was left of the bank. 

Photo credit Pixabay

 We stopped at my rock, the black one about the size of a Volkswagen flattened out. It was looking smooth, warm, and clean, showing a purple-black color. We sat on it for a while. I caressed its smooth warmth.  We walked in the wet but more solid sand up to the battery at the park coming out just north of the pier. Along the way, we looked up from gathering white stones just in time to see an eagle glide by. He had a white head and tail. Shortly after that, we saw two blue herons flying over the water together. It reminded me of seeing them on the river at Mendocino.

Photo credit Pixabay
Photo credit Pixabay

The second day at the beach, we went down the same way and turned south toward East Beach. After a leisurely fifteen-minute walk, we came to a humungous old tree trunk with its roots lying on the sand. It was at least four feet around, and if you included the tree itself and the root system, you could see that it might fill a 10-foot square room. We wondered if it would be there for a while or if the tides would take it away.

Photo credit Pixabay

LDescription: Beach, Ocean, Driftwood, Sand, Nature, Paradise

As we turned back to the opening, we saw a young doe who had come out on the same trail. She froze into the background and stayed a long time as we continued to walk toward her. Then our dog Misty saw her, and she saw Misty about the same time, so she ran. I was puzzled about why she weaved so when running until I realized that she was up near the driftwood running on the soft, damp sand. Her tracks were quite deep. I hope she found her way back to the opening by supper time. The deer swim from one island to the next in search of food. The lettuce green seaweed is good for deer to snack on, but she would eventually need something other than the salty water of the straights to drink.

The park was almost full for the sunny weekend, and we enjoyed seeing children running around. They never seemed to walk. We watched an Asian group. They had a momma and poppa tent and a tent for 5 or 10 boys about nine years old. (It just looked like ten boys the way they ran around in circles.)

I went to church again yesterday. That young pastor is so happy he makes everyone else feel happy. 

I’m at Fort Flagler washing clothes. We had to shut the door to the laundromat. Even with my yellow sweater on, It’s cold. As we look out the big window, we can see that the water looks as gray as the sky moving softly. There are no ships or boats this morning. 

Photo credit Pixabay

Dad’s hand healed up fine. He’s getting ready to pull his crab traps.

Love,

Mother and Dad 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letters from Mother-8

19 Jul

Dora Bedell Bowers

My Take

DiVoran Lites

July 25, 1983 

Marrowstone Island, WA

Lowell’s birthday. He’s 64

I’m enjoying sitting indoors with the heat on and wearing sweaters. Things got a little hot the other day. Dad was welding out by Smithy’s trailer and his red polyester flannel shirttail caught fire. He put his hand down on the flame and the material stuck to his left hand and caused 3rd degree burns on his palm. It has healed quickly. He soaked it in ice water to stop the burning and applied aloe-vera plant and some aloe-vera salve. He has been welding since you were small-he says 47 years. No! No! It’s since Dave was born-he learned on the GI bill after the war. No that was flying it was before the war in Crowley, but not 47 years. How’s that for digressing? 

We walked Saturday and saw a small flock of woodpeckers in the woods where Amy lives. They were 10-12 inches long with a bright top knot the color of a red reflector in the light. I wish I had my bird book here. Then we saw a wild canary and it sang like a canary. We also saw a ferret or brown mink, and a doe with a fawn about three weeks old following her. 

Photo credit Pixabay
Photo credit by Pixabay

Mary Ann and Shirley sang ” Happiness” yesterday, then we all sang “Heaven Came Down” together. I loved it. The ladies’ group is such a sweet time for all of us on this small island. Fran told Ivan I had a good singing voice. (He’d never believe it, but that’s all right, he’s tone-deaf, anyway, so how would he know?)

Sister Judy may come August 5. Sister-in-law, Waunita has gone to Canby Oregon to see her grandsons play baseball. She’ll be back tomorrow. Brother Smithy is eating with us while she’s gone. Please send complete instructions for tortilla chicken soup.

 Much Love,

Mom and Dad. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Letter from Mother-7

12 Jul

My Take

DiVoran Lites

July 20, 1983

Dear DiVoran, Bill, Renie, and Billy:

Thank you, thank you, for the nice long letter. Don’t expect me to answer it all today. It is enough that I take my pen in hand. I’m having a very lazy day. The sun is out now, and I am at loose ends. It would be a good time to go down to the beach and sit on my rock. I wonder if the tide is right.

Photo credit Pixabay

Well, we had a nice weekend trip to Concord. We left at 6:30, caught the 8:30 ferry, and got to Sea-Tac a couple of hours before departure. They wouldn’t take money for tickets at the gate because a United Flight had canceled, and they were putting that planeload on our flight. Dad had to walk back to the ticket counter at the last minute and pay due to a mix-up. Anyway, we were the last two to board.

Photo credit Pixabay Description: The Golden Gate Bridge

Susan and John met us in San Francisco. They had gone to Tracy on Friday. Then we drove the rented car and picked up Dave at the Oakland airport. We all got to the party at three. It started at two, and there were 18 of Ray’s closest friends there. He had a remarkable day of wit and charm and enjoyed the whole thing. They served a buffet lunch to all. The guests were there from 2 to 9. Some left about seven or so. I moved about from table to table and visited with all their friends. Kay and I talked about her being fourth-generation San Francisco and about how ladies used to wear hats and gloves all the time, and about our first jobs. Ann brought a lovely box of cookies that she specialized in making. Susan brought marble-sized, liqueur-filled chocolates. Now that would be the way to become a liqueur chocoholic.

We got up early on Monday. Helen took us to Walnut Creek, where we met Alice, who took us to the San Francisco airport. A half-hour delay for fog, and we were on our way. Saw the mountains-just the tops-on the way home and got home about three.

Helen and Ray put their Concord house up for sale and sold it for $59,000 in 21 days, so they are looking, with the help of Alice, for a place in Walnut Creek and will have until August 27 to move. We plan to help them put up shelves and pictures, etc., after their move in September. 

Alice, Susan’s mother, is going on a 31-day trip to Europe, England, Wales, Scotland, and maybe Holland. She’ll travel with Linda’s first mother-in-law. Grandmother of her children. They will visit that grandmother’s relatives. 

Photo credit Pixabay

Chris and Jen will be coming home, probably tomorrow. Susan went to get them Wednesday the 20th or Thursday the 21st. Last I heard, Jen was having a ball, and Chis wanted to come home. She had hurt her derriere on a water slide.

Tomorrow is painting. I haven’t painted this week, but I have read some in my books about how to.  No inspiration today-hope to be talented tomorrow because we are to paint a mass of big buildings tomorrow. I particularly noticed the skyscrapers in Seattle, and they are so massive and strangely different from each other. We took the route through town up that steepest hill to Highway 5 and had to stop at each cross street. That frightens me a little, afraid of rolling back. Saw a strange young man, head down, walking ten steps forward and ten steps back at the alleyway. I think he was on drugs. The newspapers were blowing all over the street. I guess some of the derelicts failed to make their beds. 

We picked a box of beautiful apricots from our trees today, the largest I have seen. We put them in the box with the remainder of 20-pound bags of Bing cherries. At 39 cents a pound for cherries at the store, wouldn’t you like to get into our box?

Loved your long letter and will try to answer sometime soon. As for now, if you’re to get this hot off the press, I’d better make tracks to the mailbox; it’s time for the mailman.

Dad says my salutation is too long. He suggested Dear People.

Love to everybody.

Mother and Dad

Dad absorbed every bit of your letter. I’ve read it twice so far, no rejection from us.

I heard a song on the Christian station. It had words in it like; “I will surrender,” “need you,” “Lord above,’ it had the same music as “Now is the Hour.” That one came out around WWII. 

Photo credit Pixabay

I forgot to comment on your hair being in a bun. Be careful that it doesn’t make you feel old. I remember you as a carrot top when we went to Westcliffe. I’ve seen the bun style some since you mentioned it.

Please forgive my small writing on the other page. I thought it would take care of all I had to say, but it didn’t.

Love, Mother

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

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