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Circuitous Travel~Part 3

13 Aug

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

 

Circuitous travel, continued – last time I told you about how much we had enjoyed our time looking around the ruins of Fountains Abbey, near Ripon, England. In preparing for today’s episode, I found more pictures of Fountains Abbey, and would like to share some of them with you. If you ever get to England, this is a really neat place to visit.

 

Most of our day, following our stay overnight in Durham, was traveling. I have no pictures that we took of Durham, or Newcastle – and none until we arrived in Edinburgh, Scotland. Here are a couple pictures of our room in the St. Valery’s Guest House.

 

 

 

It was a lovely place, and we stayed several nights there. It was managed by Mr. & Mrs. Robert Shannon. We had the good fortune to look out our room window one morning to capture this. They were still using a horse-drawn cart to deliver milk! Wonderful!

 

 

One funny incident – perhaps not funny at the time – happened there: One morning, Karen got up early and went to get her shower, before Janet woke up. When Karen went to go back into her room – the door was locked! And she had forgotten to take a key with her!! Since the girl’s room was next to ours, Fred began knocking on the wall next to their room, and eventually began knocking on the door, hoping to wake Janet up. After an excruciating 45 minutes of knocking, Mr. Shannon came up the stairs and asked if there was a “problem.” Fortunately, he had a key and let Karen in the room. Janet looked up, bleary-eyed and confused – and had not heard a single knock! She was a really hard sleeper! Karen never forgot the key after that!

The following morning we took a bus tour to St. Andrews. It was, essentially, an all-day tour, lasting from 9:30 a.m. until 6:30 p.m. Fred is a great fan of golf, so this was to be a special tour for him – to see where golf originated.

While there is some controversy about the origins of golf, I gleaned from Wikipedia:   The modern game originated in Scotland, where the first written record of golf is James II’s banning of the game in 1457, as an unwelcome distraction to learning archery. James IV lifted the ban in 1502 when he became a golfer himself, with golf clubs first recorded in 1503-1504: “For golf clubbes and balles to the King that he playit with”. To many golfers, the Old Course at St Andrews, a links course dating to before 1574, is considered to be a site of pilgrimage. In 1764, the standard 18-hole golf course was created at St Andrews when members modified the course from 22 to 18 holes. Golf is documented as being played on Musselburgh Links, East Lothian, Scotland as early as 2 March 1672, which is certified as the oldest golf course in the world by Guinness World Records

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Circuitous Travel~Part 2

6 Aug

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

 

Circuitous travel, continued. I did want to add this photo – our daughter, Karen, found it on Google Search. This is what travel is like in a C-130; that’s the way we traveled from Germany to England. Fortunately, Fred says it’s only about a 2-hour flight.

 

               Credit Google Search

Okay…on to our travels in England. We left the B&B in Mildenhall, home of Mr. & Mrs. Amber, and started our journey north toward Scotland. Our first day’s travel took us eventually to Durham for an overnight.

 

Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right – York

On our way north, we stopped in Cambridge. Within Cambridge University, we went to Trinity College and walked around a bit, taking pictures of the College.

 

    Credit Google Search and UK Fundraising

 

 

After leaving Cambridge, we headed to York.

From Wikipedia I found: York (Old Norse: Jórvík) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of Yorkshire to which it gives its name. The Emperors Hadrian, Septimius Severus and Constantius I all held court in York during their various campaigns. During his stay 207–211 AD, the Emperor Severus proclaimed York capital of the province of Britannia Inferior, and it is likely that it was he who granted York the privileges of a colonia or city. Constantius I died in 306 AD during his stay in York.

For a little more history from Wikipedia: In 1068, two years after the Norman conquest of England, the people of York rebelled. Initially the rebellion was successful but upon the arrival of William the Conqueror the rebellion was put down. William at once built a wooden fortress on a motte. In 1069, after another rebellion, William built another timbered castle across the River Ouse. These were destroyed in 1069 and rebuilt by William about the time of his ravaging Northumbria in what is called the “Harrying of the North” where he destroyed everything from York to Durham. The remains of the rebuilt castles, now in stone, are visible on either side of the River Ouse.

 

 

 

York Fire Station

 

So, as you might see, York is a most interesting place to visit. We walked around the town a bit, most impressed with the York Minister Cathedral. Quite majestic and beautiful. It seems to dominate the city. One of the interesting points in York is Clifford’s Tower, which is the “keep” of York Castle.

 

 

It sits high above the street level and is a prominent vista for the town.

 

A reconstruction of York Castle in the 14th century, viewed from the south-east

We climbed the stairs and took this picture of the city of York from there.

 

 

We left York and drove northwest to Harrogate.

 

Credit Google Search

 

From Harrogate we drove again northwest to Ripon and Fountain’s Abbey. From Wikipedia: Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. Founded in 1132, the abbey operated for 407 years, until 1539, when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

 

 

    Credit Google Search

 

We had a grand time walking through the ruins. Janet, especially, enjoyed running about through the ruins. I remember asking the gentleman at the ticket counter if there was a story about Fountain’s Abbey. His reply? “Yes.” Nothing more.

From Fountain’s Abbey, we drove northeast to Durham, where we spent the night in another B&B.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

Circuitous Travel~Part 1

30 Jul

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

Circuitous travel – I had never heard that phrase until we were about to leave Germany (1983) and return to the United States. If you aren’t familiar with that phrase, it means that you will travel from point A to point B, but not in a straight line, i.e. you will make a stop – or several stops – along the way, that are not really related to getting to your destination.

I found the following online: The Air Force defines circuitous travel as any route other than the one that would normally be prescribed by the TMF between places listed in members travel orders.

 All that information to say that, our family took advantage of circuitous travel when we left Germany and returned to the States. We took two weeks leave, and went to England.

After we had hired someone to clean our government apartment – and it was approved “clean” – we were allowed to leave Germany. We had a friend drive us to Ramstein AB (with Karen crying all the way, because she was leaving Brian behind).

 

Credit Google Search

 

We boarded a C-130 there.

 

Credit Google Search

 

It is a transport plane, and we sat knee-to-knee with each other, in canvas seats, for the time it took to fly to RAF Mildenhall, England.

 

Credit Google Search

 

We were given foam ear plugs to wear during the flight – which we really needed. That is a NOISY plane!! I made the mistake of taking one of them out of my ears, just to see how noisy it was – and regretted it immediately! It was really LOUD! So then I attempted to re-insert the foam plug into my ear – and it wouldn’t fit! So I had to endure that noise for the remainder of the flight.

 

 

About half-way through the flight, one of the flight crew came around with a cardboard box. It was filled with candy bars, and we took our pick. That was the extent of services on that flight. And that crewman didn’t look too pleased to be doing that job, either. I’m sure he would rather have been flying/navigating/etc. on that plane, rather than passing out goodies to the passengers.

 

aCredit Google Search and Amazon

 

We finally landed at RAF Mildenhall in England. Fred had arranged for a car to be delivered to us there. It was a Vauxhall, 4-door sedan, and nearly new, with just a few miles on it. It, of course, was right-hand drive, but was automatic shift. Fred hadn’t driven many stick shift vehicles in his life time, and wasn’t too keen on driving the English round-abouts with a stick shift. So we were glad to have the automatic.

By this time, it was getting rather late in the day. For some reason, Fred had not arranged for a B&B for us to stay in that night. So he began calling those in the phone book, and those the people in the terminal knew about. About the time I thought we were going to have to spent the night in the car, he was able to connect with a lady who said she would put us up, but she had to roust her children out of their beds to do so. So we finally had a bed to sleep in for that night. We had breakfast with them the next morning, and Janet had a few cats to play with and love on before we left.

Fred said it was the most expensive stay of any we had the rest of the trip. But it was worth it!

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Cat-Astrophy

23 Jul

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

 

Do you have a pet? Have you ever had a pet? Cat? Dog? Bird? Fish? Snake (yuk!)? Turtle? I could go on and on….

I’ve written a previous post about my adventure with our family cats (please see my post of April 21, 2013 – Boots and Tippy), and how much we enjoyed them. And included in that post was the information about my Aunt Jessie and Granny’s dogs. That was really the best of both worlds – we had cats, and 10 minutes away from our house was Granny and Aunt Jessie’s house with dogs. Loved them all.

 

Bill and Judy and Boots 1956

 

Boots and Trixie

 

But then I met and married Fred. His family was a military family, and his parents said that, because they moved so often, it wasn’t practical to have pets. So Fred didn’t have the pleasure of growing up with animals around the house, as I did. And, consequently, he didn’t feel the need for pets in our house. And that feeling was emphasized following his entrance into the military, himself. Same feeling as his parents – we moved so often that it wasn’t practical to have pets. So we never did.

But that’s not to say that I didn’t miss having a cat or dog following me around the house. But I also have to admit, even now, that, because we travel as often as we do, it is quite convenient not to have to arrange care for an animal.

And I find it interesting – and amusing – to find that both our daughters have pets: Karen and her family have cats; Janet and her family have dogs.

But that brings a memory to me of a time that we cat-sat for someone. We were in our first tour of duty in Germany – Wiesbaden. It was 1968, and Karen was just one year old. A family from our church went on vacation, and asked us to keep their new kitten for the few days they would be gone.

 


Credit Google Search and the Kitten Lady

 

It was cute little thing, and Karen was quite taken with it. I remember she had a set of winter mittens – hooked together by a long yarn cord. She would run through the apartment – holding one of the mittens, with the other trailing – and the kitten would chase it. She had great fun out of that.

On to the crux of this story: it was my habit to put her in the bathtub to play in the water while I cleaned the rest of the bathroom. We would have conversations, as well. I had done so one particular day when we had that kitten with us. I had cleaned the toilet, and had the lid propped up to let the seat dry. The door to the bathroom was open – and that kitten made a mad dash for the toilet – and jumped up to sit on the closed lid – only to realize, mid-leap, that the lid was up and the toilet was open! With front paws splayed, that kitten landed smack in the water in the toilet bowl! And then leaped out with a loud yowl!

 

Credit Google Search and Warren Photographic

 

That poor, wet, bedraggled kitten was quite pitiful to see! But it was one of the funniest things I think I’ve ever seen! I never knew animals could have an expression of pure terror on their face – but that one did that time!

Karen and I had quite a laugh over it. And everyone I have ever related this story to, has also gotten a good laugh out of it.

It was quite the cat-astrophy in the making!!

 

 

 

 

 

A Good Sign

16 Jul

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

Frequently, I come across something that peaks my interest. I’ve shared some of those things with you who read my posts. We’ve seen “good signs” in stores and eateries, and even in the hospitals we’ve been in.

All that brings to my mind a sign we have seen in our favorite barbecue restaurant. You see….we were introduced to 4 Rivers bbq some time ago, but their restaurant was far enough away from where we live that we didn’t get there very often – only if we were in that part of town for some reason.

 

 

 

Consequently, when we discovered that a 4 Rivers restaurant was being built about 10 minutes from our house, we were over-joyed! It has become one of our favorite places to eat. Nothing “fancy” about it, but the food is terrific! In previous posts, I’ve mentioned that 4 Rivers catered the meal for the “joint replacement reunion” (please see my post of January 22, 2017).

We are also pleased that the restaurant is closed on Sundays. They believe that everyone within their employ should have the day/time to attend a worship service of their choice, and so they have a Sunday to do so.

They have several “signs” placed around the restaurant, but this one has taken my fancy! See what you think:

 

From the 4 Rivers website:

“4 Rivers had its humble beginnings. Just me, a smoker, and an age-old challenge—cooking brisket.”

John Rivers never set out to create the most successful BBQ chain in Florida. He’s not a classically trained chef or graduate of culinary school. It was in Texas that he found the two loves of his life: his wife and the delicate art of brisket. And it’s been those very two godsends that inspired 4 Rivers as we know it.

John spent 20 years in the healthcare industry before retiring as president of a billion-dollar company. During that time, he had the opportunity to travel the country, honing his taste and talent for brisket perfection. As he soaked up the flavors and practices of ‘cue fare countrywide, John’s dream of de-regionalizing BBQ was born.

 

“This was never supposed to be a restaurant. My definition of helping meant doing what felt most natural when comfort was in order—feed those in need.”

4 Rivers Smokehouse began with the launch of the “Barbecue Ministry” in 2004, when John hosted a cookout fundraiser to support a local family whose young daughter was battling cancer. This one event resulted in a passion for supporting local schools, churches, and charitable organizations, and a few years later, smoking thousands of pounds of meat out of a garage just wouldn’t cut it anymore.

 After trials, tribulations, and a whole lot of burnt ends, we finally flipped that “Hot Brisket Now” sign on in October of 2009. Within the first hour, a line had formed out the door…and then around the corner.

 Today, we have several locations across the state of Florida, with plans for continued expansion and more than 1,000 amazing folks on our 4 Rivers team. Most importantly, the Barbecue Ministry remains our foundation and focus, and will until the cows come home.

 

So the “sign” we find there goes right along with their beginnings and policies. We enjoy the food, the atmosphere…and their signs!

Also from their website:

FUN FACT:

 Why four Rivers? In short, it represents our family, John, Monica (wife), Jared (son) and Cameron (daughter). But they also appreciate the serendipitous double meaning with Genesis 2:10, where four rivers branch from that which flows out of Eden. Now you know!

Ouch! ~Part 2

9 Jul

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

 

Continuing from last week:

From Fort Worth, we drove down to Austin, TX, by way of Waco. We stopped in at Baylor University, where my father had graduated in 1924. He was one of the three students in the very first graduating class in the School of Music from Baylor University.

 

Baylor University Music Program Class of 1924

 

In Austin, we met up with a cousin of mine I hadn’t seen since 2001, along with his wife and his brother. We had a great couple of days with them, as well.

 

 

From Austin we drove down to San Antonio, TX – one of our favorite cities! We had lived there for three years in the 1980’s, while Fred was an instructor at the U.S. Air Force Officer Training School.

 

Graduating class of new Air Force Officers

 

That first night, we had dinner with a German friend and her husband. We had met them in Germany in the late 1960’s. She was actually a friend of my Mother’s, before she became my friend. She had married an American military person, and they moved to the U.S. and San Antonio, in particular. We hadn’t seen them since we left Germany in 1970. Still dear friends.

After now having seen all the friends we had planned on seeing, we were free to “do” San Antonio at our leisure. We started off by going downtown. We had been members of the First Baptist Church while living in S.A., so stopped to see if anyone was there. Fred met someone, who said the church was, essentially, closed (it being Saturday). But we were welcome to park our car in their lot and do the famous “San Antonio River Walk” from there. So we did just that.

 

Credit Google search

 

At least, we started out on the River Walk. That had always been one of our favorite things to do in San Antonio. We walked along, enjoying the sights and sounds – and wonderful smells of Mexican food! It’s just a sidewalk on either side of the river. We were also enjoying watching a momma duck and 11 babies swimming furiously in the river.

 

 

And here’s a picture with a turtle near the ducks!

 

 

With some people coming toward us, Fred and I narrowed down to single-file. That’s when I stubbed my toe on an uneven piece of sidewalk concrete – and down I went! Hard! I remember hitting my right cheek with such force that I thought I had shattered my cheekbone!

OUCH!

When Fred – and the passing tourists – managed to get me on my feet, I realized that I had done something really bad to my right shoulder – something really painful! I thought perhaps I had dislocated my shoulder.

Unable to continue on with the River Walk, we headed back to the car. I knew that I had to go to the hospital, but was a little hungry. So as we headed to get something to eat, I texted our daughters, my brother, and my best friend, with the words “Altercation with sidewalk. Sidewalk won. Lunch first, then ER.”

That ER visit lasted four hours – and we were so glad we had taken the time to eat first! After some tests – including xrays, CT scan, and MRI – the conclusion was that I had a hairline fracture of my clavicle (collar bone), as well as a hairline fracture of my right eye socket. I saw four doctors, including an opthamologist, with instructions to follow-up with doctors here in Orlando.

Here is a photo of my eye as we were leaving the hospital. As you can see, my eye was already turning purple after just four hours.

 

 

And here is a picture of my eye as it was by the next morning. That lasted for about six weeks. Not a pretty sight, right?

 

 

So, my ouchies are better – healing well – and I am seeing the required doctors. But it is certainly not something I would like to repeat!

~~~~~~~~~~The End~~~~~~~~~~

The Door~Part 2

25 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

If you recall, back on December 13, 2015, I wrote a post about “The Door.” I began that post with:

Many years ago, I came upon something my Father had saved. It was an ‘etching’ of an ancient doorway, with lantern overhead to light the way. There was a description attached to it, explaining where and what the door was all about. Somehow, I have misplaced that etching – every once in a while I come across it, but can’t seem to find it when I’m looking for it.

As I recall, that door was somewhere in the ruins of an English castle or cathedral….”

Well, I am pleased to say – that I have found that “etching” and here it is.

 

 

As you will see, it really isn’t anything like the one we saw in Rothenburg, Germany – and no lantern overhead.

 

 

And rather than being in England, it is German – and from the Heidelberg castle. I wish I had known that when we lived those three years in Heidelberg! We walked through that lovely castle so many times, but never found this door – nor did we know it was there.

 

The title on the back of this etching is : The Doorway of Memories, and the subtitle is “From an Original Etching by Paul Geissler [1881-1965].” That’s a surprise, because we have several etchings by Paul Geissler – usually of Rothenburg.

 

 

While lengthy, I would like to present you with the description given with his “door” etching, as I find it quite interesting:

“One may well look down the vista of centuries in viewing this beautiful old ivy colored doorway. For it is part of the famed castle of Heidelberg which was first built more than six hundred years ago [now over eight hundred years ago].

Mounting guard over the picturesque German town of that name, the grim battlements are located on the high promontory of Jettenbuhl. The castle is now mostly in ruins, and presents an interesting study in architectural trends down through the ages. Originally erected through the effort of Rupert III, the building was constantly expanded as each new monarch took over the reins of government. Otto Henry, ‘The Magnanimous,’ built an important wing in 1556, while yet another was added under Frederick IV in 1601-1607.

It was from Old Heidelberg that the leading German princes of their day sallied forth on journeys of peace and conquest. Possibly on the very steps pictured by the etcher did the fair ladies of the court stand to wave a last farewell to their loved ones as the knights rode down the rocky trail. Those steps so worn with years of use, have now remained idle and dust-covered. Only the shades of those who departed centuries past still hover around the deserted castle and make this in truth ‘The Doorway of Memories.’

The etcher has accurately caught the spirit of antiquity that haunts the place. The proud coat of arms appears above the door, and the lions, ever a symbol of royalty, guard each side of the arch. Rich with lore, rich with romantic associations, here is indeed a subject which stimulates the etcher’s pen with inspiration.”

 

So that’s the story of “the door” that has fascinated me for so many years. Not at all what I remember about it, but wonderful, all the same. I hope you enjoy it, as well.

 

 

Father’s Day 2017

18 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

JUDY

 

 

 Another Father’s Day dawns this morning. As someone recently said, it’s such a pity that in today’s world of TV and comedy, fathers are portrayed as clueless and laughable. How are our boys and young men going to grow up to be the strong men of God that we want them to be, when that is their example? I am so glad that my father, my brother, and my husband grew up in times when men were, indeed, strong men of God, and spiritual leaders in their household.

And how are our girls and young women going to grow up, thinking that all the boys/men in their lives are luckless creatures – only to be tolerated? In watching the TV programs that are out there now – unfortunately including some of the current Disney programs – adults in general, and men in particular – are portrayed as stupid and ignorant, while their teenagers – and younger – are the “smart” ones. It just ain’t so, folks!

And since that was a rather depressing way to begin this post, let me get back to the men in my life who were strong believers in God and Jesus Christ, and were able to be strong, safe, places for me.

Let me tell you about my own father.

 

 

I’ve written other posts about my father (June 16, 2013; June 15, 2014; September 28, 2014; February 5, 2017) and the influence he had in my life. He was gone quite a bit – traveling around the state – but I always knew he loved me, and I looked up to him.

 

 

He was, indeed, the spiritual leader in our household.   He always took us to church with him, and our family life revolved around church and our belief in God.

 

 

Fred’s father – a second father to me after Fred and I married – was dedicated to God and His work in this world.

 

 

He was a pastor for a while, but then most of his life was doing God’s work as a military chaplain. And yet, with all that work, he was devoted to his family. He, too, was the spiritual leader in his family.

 

 

Fred and I both look back on our lives, and are so grateful that each of our fathers-in-law treated us like their son or daughter. I never felt out of place in Fred’s family, and Fred has said so many times that my father enjoyed him as if he were another son of his. We were so blest to have that in our lives.

 

And because of that, Fred grew up in a household that showered him with love – family love and God’s love. He grew to be a self-assured man that I am proud to call my husband. He taught our girls what a true man – a gentleman – is like, and what they should expect from their spouses.

 

And my brother, Bill, grew up in a household that taught him how to be a true man of God, as well. He gave his children God’s word, and the strength to be what God wants them to be.

 

Both of our girls have married men who are strong personalities, and are dedicated to the Lord. We pray for each member of their families, as they begin to have families of their own.

 

8

 

7

 

There is a scripture that helps with this:

Start children off on the way they should go,

and even when they are old they will not turn from it.

Proverbs 22:6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memories of New Mexico~Part 15

11 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

More random memories of New Mexico.

 

I have found some old newspaper clippings that my mother sent to us many years ago, about Albuquerque. And they reminded me of some of my growing-up years there.

I remember going downtown – especially from our church, which was very near downtown. It was located on the corner of Broadway and Central, directly across Broadway from the old Albuquerque High School. That High School was later relocated to another part of town, and the building sat vacant for many years. It was later totally gutted and turned into condominiums. It’s apparently quite “the place” to live in near downtown Albuquerque.

 

The old Albuquerque High School credit Google Search

 

However, back to going downtown from my church….

 

First Baptist Church, Albuquerque credit Google Search

 

It was a quick walk from the church. But to do so, you had to walk under the railroad tracks – and it was very deep ravine to walk through. It was also known by the locals as “the underpass.” I remember that, whenever there was a flash flood, or severe downpour (yes, we DO get those in semi-desert New Mexico), that ravine would flood, and cars were unable to pass through it.

One of the newspaper clippings mother sent is here. The car in the foreground is about to go into the underpass – you can see the “slant” to the road.

 

 

That’s the famous Route 66 you are looking down. Better known as Central Avenue in town. I love the old cars and buses. I remember the YMCA building there on the right. And remember my post about the old movie theaters in town? (Please see my post for May 7, 2017)   I mentioned the Sunshine Theater – and there it is on the left in this picture. I have scanned the picture, and “enhanced” it, so it is more easily recognizable.

I remember always liking the old railroad station there – just on the other side of the ravine and the railroad tracks. It was actually not just a station, but also a hotel. It was the Alvarado station, and here is an old “picture” of it.

 

Credit Google Search

 

Credit Google Search

 

And now a picture of the new station.

 

Rail and bus station Credit Google Search

 

The old one burned down in the 1970’s, and the new one was built to resemble the old one. It is in keeping with the pueblo style of architecture.

This other newspaper clipping is of the original Monte Vista Fire Station. I remember when it actually was a fire station. A new fire station has been built elsewhere, and the old one has been turned into a restaurant. It, too, is in keeping with the pueblo style architecture.

 

 

Fred and I have had a meal or two at this restaurant, and it’s quite good. While the fire station is located near what is called Nob Hill, it is not very far from the house where I grew up. And my elementary school was called Monte Vista Elementary School. So it was all quite close. And if you will see my post of May 7, 2017, you will see I mentioned the Lobo movie theater. This fire station restaurant is quite close to the Lobo theater.

 

Oh my, these are such fun memories for me!

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memories of New Mexico~Part 14

4 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

Back to more random memories of New Mexico.

I’ve never really been that interested in snow skiing. I’ve always enjoyed watching the Winter Olympics and all the events involving snow – skiing, snowboarding, etc. I admire those who enjoy it….but it’s just not for me.

Part of the reason is that it was always a more expensive sport than I had the money to participate in. And I’m not really very much of a dare-devil, so all that downhill skiing – straight down a mountain!! – left my stomach in knots just thinking about it!

But New Mexico was put on the map with all the advertisements about snow skiing in Taos.

 

Credit Google Search and Powderhounds

 

That was just the “place to be” if you wanted to ski. But in spite of that, I had heard many people say that, the best kept secret was that the skiing in the mountains outside Albuquerque were some of the very best!!

Fred and I recently went on a two-week driving trip, and in one of the spots where we stayed, I picked up a magazine called Ski New Mexico True. In looking through this magazine, I see that those who create the magazine have listed nearly every skiing resort in the state. The pictures are gorgeous! And they make it very inviting – to those who enjoy that sport. They mention Taos Ski Valley. Also Angel Fire Resort, Red River,

 

Credit Google Search and Red River

 

Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, Sipapu Ski Resort, Ski Apache, Ruidoso,

 

Credit Google Search

 

Ski Santa Fe,

 

Credit Google Search and Kyle Webb

 

and finally….Sandia Peak in Albuquerque.

 

Credit Google Search

 

 

They list a lot of both summer and winter events to tweak ones interest. I found it to be a most interesting magazine.

Unfortunately, one of the main reasons I never got into snow skiing was not a happy one. When I was in my young teens, I was in the process of preparing my mouth/teeth to have braces to straighten out my teeth. In order to do so, I needed to have four of my permanent teeth removed. In case you’ve ever “counted” your teeth, you have four “sets” of bicuspid teeth – two on each side, top and bottom. They are the smaller teeth right behind your canine teeth, but before you get to the molars. Well, one of each “set” had to come out, to make room for all the teeth to line up properly.

There was a new dentist in town – probably fresh out of dental school. He was what I would call a “dreamboat” back in that day, and, of course, I was madly in love with him! And that happened even if he was hurting me by pulling out those teeth!

Teeth were all pulled…and I was healing well enough to start having the braces applied to my teeth. Mother told me that this wonderful dentist had gone skiing one weekend, but had fallen and broken his leg. Ouch! That hurt! As it turned out, the day before he was to be released from the hospital, he developed a blood clot in his leg that traveled to his heart – and he died!!

As you might imagine – my first thought was….I’M NEVER GOING SKIING!! And I never did.

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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