Tag Archives: Travel Series

Florida Travel~Next Stop Great Smoky Mountains National Park

15 Aug

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

 

Smoky Mountains in the fall.

 

                  https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g143031-Activities-  Great_Smoky_Mountains_National_Park_Tennessee.html

I haven’t traveled outside of Florida much, but I will say that The Great Smoky Mountains in the fall is the most beautiful place I have ever been. Being a native Floridian, a flatlander, I was overwhelmed by the mountains and the colors, the rocky creeks and the music of the water flowing over the rock.

 

 

Strangely what I loved the most is looking out and seeing the mesmerizing design from the abstract lines created by the shapes of each mountain and valley. And how each layer is a distinct shade and color. The morning sun outlining it all.  Almost Heaven is the feeling that comes over me. The crisp air awakening my senses. I feel so close to God being in the spectacular beauty of His handiwork. This place the finest candy for my eyes. The images etched in my soul forever.

 

 

We stayed in Gatlinburg, at the heart of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Here you will find lots to do if you have kids. It is similar to I-Drive in Orlando. It is also the gateway to 441 the main road through the mountains.

 

 

 

My favorite place here is Roaring Fork, a driving nature trail. This is a must. You drive through it, stopping all along the beautiful creek that runs along most of the way. There are many places to park and hike to falls. This is like all of the Smokies in one gorgeous road through Heaven.

 

 

Also along Roaring Fork are historic buildings.

 

 

 

You can explore them. It’s amazing to see how the people lived. At the end of the trail is a little store you can by goodies.

There are so many beautiful places, but I will tell you about some of my favorites. If you are going there, be sure to do your homework first, make a plan especially if you plan to visit some falls. There are some right on the road and there are some that are very difficult to get to.

Our first stop every morning is one of the few places you can enjoy a sunrise. Newfound Gap.

 

 

It’s an overlook with restrooms and an entrance to the Appalacian Trail.

 

 

Take a walk on this beautiful trail. It’s just beautiful and so are the people you may meet traveling on it.

 

 

Clingmans dome is a popular stop. This tower is at 6643 feet which is the highest point in the smoky mountains national park. The view is spectacular, but the climb up is very difficult. It is a nice paved walk, but half a mile and very steep.

 

 

 

If you go to Cherokee, be sure to stop at Ocoaluftee visitor center. There is a lot there to see.

 

You can walk the short trail to the river, see historic buildings and you may see some elk in the field by the highway. Also near by is an easy walk to Mingus Mill. It is a working grist mill where you can buy goodies such as freshly ground corn meal.

 

 

There are so many wonderful waterfalls. Many are not easy to get to. So check them out first according to which ones will fit you physically. They are all different and most are challenging to get to.

 

 

 

 

Wildfires in the beginning of this year destroyed a lot, but it is already healing and open to tourism.

Please join me next week. We are going to New Hampshires White Mountains.

 

 

Florida Travel Moves North

8 Aug

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

 

Savannah, Georgia

Exploring Savannah was so exciting. There is so much to see. So many wonderful restaurants and so much history. And of course it is an artist and photographers paradise.

 

 

On River Street, in the heart of historic Savannah, you’ll find everything from sweets to teddy bears, Harley Davidson apparel, and art galleries housed inside restored Cotton Warehouses. The working harbor—filled with ships of all kinds, horse-drawn carriage rides and street performers add to the enticement of this idyllic waterfront locale.

 

 

Stop in for a bite at any of 21 restaurants or simply enjoy the scenery.

Historic River Street, paved with 200-year-old cobblestones, runs along the length of the Savannah River.

 

 

The Port of Savannah is a major U. S. seaport. Savannah had a record year in fiscal 2007, becoming the fourth-busiest and fastest-growing container terminal in the U.S.

 

 

Once lined with warehouses holding King CottonWalk along the Savannah River;  Picture horse drawn wagons loaded with bails of cotton brought to be bid on, sold and unloaded here.

 

 

Follow the link below to discover the many things there are to do in Savannah.

https://www.trolleytours.com/savannah/attractions

Another place that is interesting is Bonaventure Cemetery.  The entrance to the cemetery is located at 330 Bonaventure Road. The peaceful setting rests on a scenic bluff of the Wilmington River, east of Savannah. This charming site has been a world famous tourist destination for more than 150 years due to the old tree-lined roadways, the many notable persons interred, the unique cemetery sculpture and architecture.

 

 

We are now headed to Tybee Island only 18 miles away. But we are going to make a stop at Fort Pulaski. It’s on the way.

 

in 1862 during the American Civil War, the Union Army successfully tested rifled cannon in combat, the success of which rendered brick fortifications obsolete. The fort was also used as a prisoner-of-war camp.

 

The brick and honey comb interior is stunning.

 

 

 

On our way again to Tybee Island we go over Lazaretto Creek. We can see the marina below.

 

http://www.tybeeislandmarina.com/

 

 

Tybee Island Light

Tybee Island is a barrier island and small city near Savannah, Georgia. It’s known for its wide, sandy beaches, including South Beach, with a pier and pavilion. In the island’s north, Fort Screven has 19th-century concrete gun batteries and the Tybee Island Light Station and Museum.

 

 

Swings found along the Tybee Island beach offer a great spot to relax and take in the views.

 

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g35328-Activities-Tybee_Island_Georgia.html

 

 

Besides the beach there are quaint shops and restaurants. It’s a great destination.

Visit me next week for a visit to the mountains in fall. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

 

Smoky Mountains at sunrise.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Circuitous Travel~Part 2

6 Aug

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

 

Circuitous travel, continued. I did want to add this photo – our daughter, Karen, found it on Google Search. This is what travel is like in a C-130; that’s the way we traveled from Germany to England. Fortunately, Fred says it’s only about a 2-hour flight.

 

               Credit Google Search

Okay…on to our travels in England. We left the B&B in Mildenhall, home of Mr. & Mrs. Amber, and started our journey north toward Scotland. Our first day’s travel took us eventually to Durham for an overnight.

 

Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right – York

On our way north, we stopped in Cambridge. Within Cambridge University, we went to Trinity College and walked around a bit, taking pictures of the College.

 

    Credit Google Search and UK Fundraising

 

 

After leaving Cambridge, we headed to York.

From Wikipedia I found: York (Old Norse: Jórvík) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of Yorkshire to which it gives its name. The Emperors Hadrian, Septimius Severus and Constantius I all held court in York during their various campaigns. During his stay 207–211 AD, the Emperor Severus proclaimed York capital of the province of Britannia Inferior, and it is likely that it was he who granted York the privileges of a colonia or city. Constantius I died in 306 AD during his stay in York.

For a little more history from Wikipedia: In 1068, two years after the Norman conquest of England, the people of York rebelled. Initially the rebellion was successful but upon the arrival of William the Conqueror the rebellion was put down. William at once built a wooden fortress on a motte. In 1069, after another rebellion, William built another timbered castle across the River Ouse. These were destroyed in 1069 and rebuilt by William about the time of his ravaging Northumbria in what is called the “Harrying of the North” where he destroyed everything from York to Durham. The remains of the rebuilt castles, now in stone, are visible on either side of the River Ouse.

 

 

 

York Fire Station

 

So, as you might see, York is a most interesting place to visit. We walked around the town a bit, most impressed with the York Minister Cathedral. Quite majestic and beautiful. It seems to dominate the city. One of the interesting points in York is Clifford’s Tower, which is the “keep” of York Castle.

 

 

It sits high above the street level and is a prominent vista for the town.

 

A reconstruction of York Castle in the 14th century, viewed from the south-east

We climbed the stairs and took this picture of the city of York from there.

 

 

We left York and drove northwest to Harrogate.

 

Credit Google Search

 

From Harrogate we drove again northwest to Ripon and Fountain’s Abbey. From Wikipedia: Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. Founded in 1132, the abbey operated for 407 years, until 1539, when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

 

 

    Credit Google Search

 

We had a grand time walking through the ruins. Janet, especially, enjoyed running about through the ruins. I remember asking the gentleman at the ticket counter if there was a story about Fountain’s Abbey. His reply? “Yes.” Nothing more.

From Fountain’s Abbey, we drove northeast to Durham, where we spent the night in another B&B.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

Florida Travel~Florida Keys

25 Jul

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

 

I have been going to the Florida Keys for 40 years. It is so tropical and so different from the rest of Florida. If you love the sun, beach life and water, this is paradise.

 

 

Drive the Overseas Highway across a 113-mile chain of coral and limestone islands connected by 42 bridges, one of them seven miles long.

 

Each Key is a little different and offers it’s own uniqueness.

 

 

My favorite Key is Bahia Honda State Park.

 

 

All of the Keys are made up of hard coral and most first time campers are surprised when they try to hammer their tent stakes in the ground. They are useless. One must buy very large nails and drive them in to hold down the tent ties.  This is true also here, but this park is actually one of the few with stunning shallow white sandy beaches and are awarded the worlds best beach.

Henry Flagler’s railroad to Key West turned the remote island of Bahia Honda Key into a tropical destination.

https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/Bahia-Honda

The island’s name, Spanish for “deep bay”.

A walk on the Old Bahia Honda Bridge offers a panoramic view of the Gulf and Atlantic waters.

The National Key Deer Refuge On Big Pine Key was established in 1957 to protect and preserve in the national interest of the Key deer and other wildlife resources in the Florida Keys.

 

 

The Refuge is located in the lower Florida Keys and currently consists of approximately 9,200 acres of land that includes pine rockland forests, tropical hardwood hammocks, freshwater wetlands, salt marsh wetlands, and mangrove forests.

Marathon Key – Snuba dive Sombrero Reef

 

https://www.tildensscubacenter.com/

I have been a scuba diver for many years, but snuba is truly the way to go. Anyone can do it. We dove Sombrero Reef with this company and was very pleased. Check it out if exploring the beautiful underwater world is on your bucket list.

Another delightful thing to do in the Keys is to swim with the dolphin. There are a few places that offer it.

http://www.floridakeysswimwithdolphins.com/

Key West  The Southernmost Point Buoy is an anchored concrete buoy in Key West, Florida marking the southernmost point in the continental United States.

 

 

Key West Lighthouse. 

As you walk the shops and restauraunts of Key West,

you can see the lighthouse in most locations.

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_West_lighthouse

 

And don’t forget to end your day at Mallory Square to enjoy eats, entertainment and celebrate a gorgeous sunset.

Join me next week to enjoy Blowing Rocks. An unusual beach for Florida.

 

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Florida Travel~St. Augustine

27 Jun

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

 

St Augustine. This is one of my favorite places for photography.

 

https://www.visitstaugustine.com/venue/visitor-information-center

 

Go to the visitor center when you get there or online and make your plans for the day. It will save you a lot of walking and help you discover the tours and unique places and restaurants to visit. I recommendthat you get the trolly for the day. It’s a good way to get around. You cannot see everything in one day.

 

 

There is so much amazing history here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_St._Augustine,_Florida

 

 

 

 

Painted ceiling and dome inside Flagler College

 

There are other great places in the area too, like the St Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park.

 

https://www.alligatorfarm.com/

 

If you go in the spring you can get close up images of nesting birds and their young. You can safely get very close ups of alligators and other wildlife.

 

 

The beaches in St augustine are quite beautiful.

 

There are many nice hotels to stay in right on the beach or you can camp at Anastasia State Park. The beach and sand dunes are gorgeous

 

 

and be sure to visit the lighthouse and museum.

 

https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/anastasia

http://www.staugustinelighthouse.org/

Back on the road again, we will be heading west across north Florida to the Suwannee River.

 

 

Our stop is a quaint resort I have gone to for years. There are many nice places to stay, but River Rendezvous is very special to me.

http://www.suwanneeriverrendezvous.com/

 

It is now a wonderful rustic family resort right on the Suwannee, but when I stayed there many years ago it was a resort for scuba divers.

You see this area of north Florida is the cave diving capital of the world because of an extensive cave system of porous marine limestone. The underground limestone has miles of “Karst” cave formations where cool crystal clear water flows from the Floridan Aquifer through numerous springs into majestic Suwannee River.

 

and other scenic rivers and streams.

In my younger, adventurous days I came here many times to scuba dive in these amazing caves. It was thrilling.

I would like to describe this adventure to you and take you with me. It’s an experience most people have never lived.

It was so long ago that I do not have pictures to share unfortunately.

There are many beautiful springs in this area. Peacock Springs is one of the popular springs and is now a state park.  The link below shows fantastic pictures of the springs and underwater caves.

https://www.floridastateparks.org/photo-gallery/peacock-springs

Check out those pictures, then let’s go diving. Are you ready?

First we put on our wet suits and gear in the parking area and walk down very uneven ground to get to the waters entrance. This is most exhausting from the heat, struggling to get into your wetsuit and the weight of the tank and equipment. Before we go in, everyone must spend time checking each others equipment. You don’t want anything to go wrong down there. Safety is top importance. Once you make it in the water, the 72 degree water rushes in your wet suit. It is really cold at first, but will warm and insulate you the rest of the time. We put on our mask and fins, regulator in our mouth and lower ourselves into the crystal clear water. Looking around you are mezmerized by the fish, rocks, vegetation and sunlight making the water sparkle. You feel that you are totally weightless and have a sense of flying. You see the cavern entrance and go inside. You stop and look around. It is dark, but is illuminated by the light streaming in from the entrance. Fish are swimming in the sunlight outside and inside around you. The plants are undilating from the current of water flow from the cave. The water is gently flowing across your skin. It’s a beautiful sight and you are flying around in it. Your dive buddy signals to head inside the cave tunnel and attaches his line to a connection in the rock.

This line is life or death. It goes with you and you follow it back out. It is totally dark ahead. You turn on your flash lights and you can see the porous limestone, perhaps an albino shrimp or catfish. You may even see an eel laying on the rocks. The whole area looks like honeycombs as you fly through the cave tunnel. At some points along the way, you are only feet from the surface and you become lighter, other times you are deep and a great distance from the surface and you become heavy due to the pressure. You adjust your boyancy and continue. Sometimes the tunnel opens up to a large room. The tunnel  ends and before you realize it, you are past it and you’re looking down 50 feet below you. Like a cartoon charactor that runs off a cliff and realized they are suspended in mid air. It’s a frightening feeling at first. But then, it is so cool to be hovering in space. The water is perfectly clear and it looks like air.

You turn to go back and it’s hard to tell where you came in, openings in the honeycomb all look the same. Oh, but you have the line to guide you back.

The cave is full of silt. Like years of dust on the floor. Once we took a side trip off the main tunnel. We got too close to the floor and stirred the silt with the kick of a fin. In seconds, we could no longer see our hands in front of our face. Because we were weightless, we didn’t even know if we were upside down or not. Luckily, we had our hands on the line and knew it led out. I was following the line out, totally blind, I hit a rock. The line had slipped under a large rock and it took me a while to figure out how to get around it. This was a dangerous moment, but thank the Lord, we came out ok.

Cave diving is extreme, but if you would like to experience it in a better way, try Snuba. Dive in the Keys the easy way. I have tried this and it is truly the way to enjoy the liquid world underwater.

https://www.snuba.com/the-florida-keys/

Please join me next week to a trip to Panama City Beach

 

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Florida Travel Series~Titusville, Florida

6 Jun

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

 

I am a native of Florida. I love this state and have explored most of it. Florida is so diverse in landscapes and things to do and see. Many have not been discovered.

My next series will reveal some of the unknown beauty of my favorite places in Florida seen through  my camera lens.

I will start in my own back yard in Titusville Florida. There is so much to do here especially for nature lovers.

Follow this link to all the things this area has to offer http://nbbd.com/godo/

Titusville is a sleepy, quaint town, but is in the process of growth from the commercial space programs in development now at the Kennedy Space Center.

The Titusville community was originally called Sand Point.

 

 

Henry T. Titus arrived in 1867 with the intention to build a town on land owned by his wife, Mary Hopkins Titus, daughter of a prominent planter from Darien, Georgia.

 

A promenient feature of the area is the A. Max Brewer Bridge, a 65 feet fixed high-level span on SR-406 connecting Titusville to Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and Canaveral National Seashore, opened on February 5, 2011 to replace the former swing bridge built in 1949.

Underneath the north side of the bridge is a catwalk, the Veterans Memorial Fishing Pier, for fishing and enjoyment of the Indian River Lagoon. It is known locally as the “World’s Longest Free Fishing Pier. Many a fish or shrimp dinner was caught here.

 

 

It is the gateway to the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

 

 

The land was acquired by NASA in the early 1960s for the development of the Space Center and its non-operational purposes.

 

 

 

The refuge is a natural buffer for NASA and provides a range of habitats, from saltwater estuaries and freshwater impoundments and marshes, to dunes, hardwood hammocks, and scrub. It contains over 1000 species of plants, 117 species of fish, 68 amphibians and reptiles, 330 birds, and 31 mammal species. It is a haven for birders, photographers, fishermen and nature lovers.

 

The refuge provides hiking and driving trails for visitors, with opportunities for observing wildlife without causing disturbance. Some popular driving trails are Black Point Dr, Bio Lab Rd and Gator Rd.

 

Also within the Refuge is Playalinda Beach. A quiet beach loved by fisherman.

 

Stop by the visitors information center for maps, regulations and info. Located east on SR406 (Garden Street) just over Max Brewer Causeway Bridge on the right.

Next week we will explore Ponce Inlet.

 

This will be one of several stops along A1A north to St Augustine and beyond.

 

 

 

Melody

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.

Memories of New Mexico~Part 14

4 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

Back to more random memories of New Mexico.

I’ve never really been that interested in snow skiing. I’ve always enjoyed watching the Winter Olympics and all the events involving snow – skiing, snowboarding, etc. I admire those who enjoy it….but it’s just not for me.

Part of the reason is that it was always a more expensive sport than I had the money to participate in. And I’m not really very much of a dare-devil, so all that downhill skiing – straight down a mountain!! – left my stomach in knots just thinking about it!

But New Mexico was put on the map with all the advertisements about snow skiing in Taos.

 

Credit Google Search and Powderhounds

 

That was just the “place to be” if you wanted to ski. But in spite of that, I had heard many people say that, the best kept secret was that the skiing in the mountains outside Albuquerque were some of the very best!!

Fred and I recently went on a two-week driving trip, and in one of the spots where we stayed, I picked up a magazine called Ski New Mexico True. In looking through this magazine, I see that those who create the magazine have listed nearly every skiing resort in the state. The pictures are gorgeous! And they make it very inviting – to those who enjoy that sport. They mention Taos Ski Valley. Also Angel Fire Resort, Red River,

 

Credit Google Search and Red River

 

Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, Sipapu Ski Resort, Ski Apache, Ruidoso,

 

Credit Google Search

 

Ski Santa Fe,

 

Credit Google Search and Kyle Webb

 

and finally….Sandia Peak in Albuquerque.

 

Credit Google Search

 

 

They list a lot of both summer and winter events to tweak ones interest. I found it to be a most interesting magazine.

Unfortunately, one of the main reasons I never got into snow skiing was not a happy one. When I was in my young teens, I was in the process of preparing my mouth/teeth to have braces to straighten out my teeth. In order to do so, I needed to have four of my permanent teeth removed. In case you’ve ever “counted” your teeth, you have four “sets” of bicuspid teeth – two on each side, top and bottom. They are the smaller teeth right behind your canine teeth, but before you get to the molars. Well, one of each “set” had to come out, to make room for all the teeth to line up properly.

There was a new dentist in town – probably fresh out of dental school. He was what I would call a “dreamboat” back in that day, and, of course, I was madly in love with him! And that happened even if he was hurting me by pulling out those teeth!

Teeth were all pulled…and I was healing well enough to start having the braces applied to my teeth. Mother told me that this wonderful dentist had gone skiing one weekend, but had fallen and broken his leg. Ouch! That hurt! As it turned out, the day before he was to be released from the hospital, he developed a blood clot in his leg that traveled to his heart – and he died!!

As you might imagine – my first thought was….I’M NEVER GOING SKIING!! And I never did.

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peru and Amazon River~Part 5

9 May

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

 

 

Huacachina, an oasis Huacachina

 

 

Our next adventure took us to a real live oasis. Just like in the movies. As we traveled there to see it, we passed mostly very poor living conditions and such a harsh environment. It was for the most part, sand, heat and dry.

 

We arrived and were greeted with locals renting four wheelers to have a blast riding in the sand. We passed on that.

 

 

Huacachina is a village in southwestern Peru, built around a small oasis surrounded by sand dunes.

\

 

According to local legends the water and mud of the area is supposed to have curative powers and both locals and tourists often bath in the waters or plaster themselves with the mud in an attempt to cure ailments such as arthritis, rheumatism, asthma and bronchitis.

5

 

Water stopped seeping into the lake in the 1980s and this has now started to become a threat to the lagoon. Recently, private landowners near the oasis have installed wells, which has reduced the level of water in the oasis. To compensate for this water loss, and preserve the oasis as an aesthetically pleasing destination for tourists, a group of ten businessmen devised a plan to pump water from a nearby farm into the lagoon.

 

 

The actual process of artificially pumping water into the oasis began on April 2, 2015 and since then more than 73,000 cubic meters of water has been pumped into the lagoon raising the height of the water by as much as 3 meters. The governor of the region was highly appreciative of the effort. It was announced in 2016 that the Peruvian scientist Marino Morikawa, who created a nanobubble system to decontaminate lake El Cascajo, will be given the project of restoring the Huacachina lagoon.

 

 

I wish him well. It is an amazing place, I was in total amazment that such a place could really be possible. As far as you could see were hills and beautiful hills of sand. Just sand.

 

 

Follow me next week. Our adventure will take us to the Nazca lines. A mystery to this day.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Peru and Amazon River~Part 3

25 Apr

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

Shaman of the Amazon rainforest

After waking and eating another delicious breakfasts on the boat that always included delightful papya and bananas, we were off on our walk through the rainforest to meet the Shaman.

 

 

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We sat in an open hut in a circle. We were all given a personal blessing. The Shaman would walk among us saying prayers in his native tongue and blow smoke on us as he chanted. We spent about an hour there. The experience was quite interesting. He had eyes full of knowledge and concern. His head dress was of meaningful feathers and his apprentices head dress was made of seeds and forest elements.

 

 

To some, the term “Shaman” may conjure up images of tricksters more than healers.

 

But authentic Shamans are masters of a sacred craft, living repositories of centuries of therapeutic wisdom.

The depth of shamans’ knowledge on preventive medicine and diagnostics has astonished even physicians who have studied their approach.

Shaman know the forest and medicinal treasures better than we do. And better than we ever will.

 

They will tell you that many human afflictions and diseases are from the heart, mind and spirit. Western medicine can’t touch them. He cures them.

Most medicine men and women and shamans remaining in the Amazon Rainforest are 70 years old or more.

Most of the shamans today do not have apprentices. So when a shaman dies, thousands of years of accumulated knowledge come completely and irreversibly to an end.

On our walk back we stopped in a location that had been logged. Each of us had an opportunity to give back to nature and plant a brand new tree.

 

Back on the boat and we will be stopping at our next excursion to a village that makes distilled rum from sugar cane. Please join me next week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Peru and the Amazon River~Part 2

18 Apr

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

Amazon River Commerce

As we traveled to our next location on the live a board, we saw several rafts along the way. They are going to a market to sell their goods.

They would build live aboard rafts with everything sellable even the balsa wood that makes the raft. They would live in them for days or weeks until reaching their destination where they could sell the goods. Then take a water service back home.

 

 

There are no bridges that cross the Amazon, mostly because there is no need, the majority of the Amazon River runs through rainforests rather than roads or cities.

The river is the principal path of transportation for people and produce in the regions, with transport ranging from balsa rafts and dugout canoes to hand built wooden river craft and modern steel hulled craft.

 

 

 

The river markets are busy. This is their grocery, pharmacy, household supplies and gathering place. They can buy many things including natural medicines for healing from the rainforest.

 

 

 

Some goods are brought to street markets in other locations. We were able to walk around here, but the guide would not allow us to bring money or cameras because of the pick pockets. A small distance away was a tent village full of the extremely poor.

 

Back on the boat, we docked at our next location where we will take a walk in the rainforest and visit the Shaman.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody
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