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Fred Remembers-Part 16

9 Dec

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

During my senior year at Narimasu,

 

Tokyo American High School Narimasu

 

I was concerned about what I was going to do about college.  I knew I wanted to go to college, but I wasn’t sure where.

In the meantime, while we were in Japan, I had come down with some fairly annoying hay fever.  It wasn’t quite asthma, but similar.  Lots of people told me I needed to go to a dry climate, so I was looking and inquiring around as to where a good place to go to school would be.

The librarian at Johnson Air Base – I don’t remember how I got to discussing it with her – talked to me about going to college, and she was from Albuquerque, New Mexico, which is little over a mile high.

 

Sandia Mountains outside Albuquerque, New Mexico – credit Google Search

 

It is obviously semi-desert and very dry climate.  She persuaded me to put in an application for the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.

 

University of New Mexico – Credit Google Search and UNM website

 

UNM lobo – mascot – Credit Google Search and UNM website

 

I had already applied to Washington State University, Purdue University, Florida State University, and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois.  I actually had line numbers for Washington State and the University of Illinois.

Fortunately, my grade levels had improved over the years, and I was able to be the Valedictorian of my high school class, had done fairly well on the National Merit testing, and received Honorable Mention.  [Judy’s comments here: Fred’s sisters once told me that he went straight from age 12 to 20!  He lost all interest in pursuing girls, and began his absorption in his studies]   All that meant that the universities were sort-of bidding for my attendance.  But the librarian persuaded me that the University of New Mexico would be a good fit, both for the climate, and also the fact that it had a good physics department, which I was interested in.  I was especially interested in astronomy, and UNM had their own observatory there.  I think that was the last school I applied to, and I was, fortunately, accepted.

Since UNM was a land-grant school, even though I was out-of-state, the tuition was very reasonable – as I recall, it was about $323 per semester for tuition and about the same for room and board.  My parents were happy with that, and I happened to get a scholarship from my high school.

With all that in mind, come August of 1957, I left the family in Tokyo…….

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Fred Remembers-Part 15

2 Dec

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

I remember that at both Tachikawa and Johnson, I rode a bus about 45 minutes to get from the housing area  to Narimasu High School, which was in Grant Heights, which was in a housing area in Tokyo.  It was about a 750 student school complex that went all the way from 5thgrade through 12thgrade.  Even the high school portion was about 500 students, so it was a pretty good-sized school.  (The entire Grand Heights area was demolished by the Japanese for the 1968 summer Olympics).

 


Narimasu High School

 

It was an interesting situation there, especially going to school in Japan.  I remember several experiences with earthquakes.  We never received any damage, but I remember how the chandeliers in our room would sway.  I remember one time during one of the Baccalaureate services I was attending, and my Dad was preaching, that we had an earthquake.  The whole building was moving around and shaking.  One of the guys accused my Dad of being an “earthshaking” preacher.

In the Fall of 1955, a young airman started and led a Christian Youth Fellowship (CYF) that met every Sunday evening in the base Chapel.  I decided to join this group.  I soon recognized that four or five of the teens were different from the rest:  they had purpose; were happy and helpful; and they did not curse or tell off-color jokes.  In fact, they were the real Christians in the group.  I wanted to be like them.

About the same time, my father brought home a book he found in a book store in Tokyo.  The book was Letters to Young Churches by J. B. Phillips.  It was, in fact, a contemporary translation of Paul’s New Testament letters.  As I read the book – for the first time in my life God’s Word came alive to me.

 

 

These two events:  the few real believers in the CYF, and the modern translation of Paul’s letters, together with the testimony of both my parents, who were strong believers, combined to lead me to commit my life to Christ.

 

Chaplain and Mrs. Charles Wills

 

As stated in the previous blog, in the summer of 1956, my Dad was transferred from Tachi to Johnson AB, on the opposite side of Tokyo.  Johnson AB did not have a CYF, so I started one.  The first meeting was myself and my younger sister, Emily.  Within a month or so, we were averaging over 20 teens attending, out of 28 who lived on the base.

In late summer of 1956, the CYF group from several military bases in the Tokyo area met for a retreat at a resort near the foot of Mount Fujiyama (affectionately known an Mt. Fuji).  The two events I remember from the retreat are: (1) I preached my first sermon (about 20 minutes long), and (2) I climbed Mt. Fuji (12,395 feet above sea level).

 

 

The climb over loose rocks and large boulders was somewhat difficult.  To aid the climb we purchased poles about 6 feet long and octagonal in shape.  At each of the 10 stations along the trail, for a few cents, we had the poles marked with a wood burned stamp that gave the altitude and the name of the station.   A few of the stations, including the top station, also sold small flags to attach to the pole.  We started the climb in the evening and stopped at a shelter after midnight.  We got up very early so we would arrive at the top before sunrise.  I still remember that the sunrise at the top was fantastic!

 

Fred’s sister, Emily, adds

Yes, I did do a hike up Mt. Fuji, and I remember that Fred was with the group. (Actually I climbed it twice) .  Great fun, and good exercise.

Emily still has her hiking stick – here is a picture of it, with stamps and flags

 

Emily’s hiking stick – Mt. Fuji

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Fred Remembers-Part 14

25 Nov

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

We also used to make trips into Tokyo itself by either car or train.  One interesting thing about the train ride was that – of course the Japanese could always tell who the Americans were, and we could tell who they were – the students, because they were always in uniform.  All the school children wore uniforms.  For some years they had been studying English in school.  One of the fun things was that some of the little school kids, some of them pre-teens or even teenagers, would come up and ask us to help them with their pronunciation.  They knew the grammar better than I did, but they needed some help with their pronunciation.  They never could get the “L” and the “R” sounds.  It just wasn’t in their language, so it was foreign to them, and they had lots of struggle with those sounds.

Back in those days, Kobe beef was the rage which, if I remember right, was beef that had been fed beer to drink, and when they slaughtered the beef, aged it with potatoes and carrots and other vegetables for quite some time, which made it very tender.

There was an interesting restaurant called Suehiro’s (advertised as the World’s Largest Steakhouse with the World’s Best Beef), which was our favorite restaurant.  This was back in the days when, in most restaurants, you could get a steak for $1.25.  We used to pay $3.00 or $4.00 for one of those fairly big T-bone steaks at Suehiro’s. It was a real treat – you could cut it with your fork it was so tender!  I think that now that same beef would be over $100 for the meal.

There was a Tea House in Tokyo that was a multi-storied building.  Each story served a different type of tea.  Green tea in one, and very sweet “black” tea on another floor.

 

Fred’s Mother, Kitty (in white top, center), performing a Japanese Tea ritual

 

There was a theater on base that was round, with an opening in the roof that could be opened in good weather.

Charles wrote:   Since this was a flying outfit, I also flew with our pilots, sometimes in the local area cruising around Mount Fuji or crossing the Sea of Japan to take passengers to Korea.  On one of those trips I flew over with 169 people on board, and on the return to Tachikawa, sat in the cabin with the pilots and the engineer.  On that flight our number 1 engine developed a fire. The engineer, a Master Sergeant, took his tool box and made his way out through the wing, passing through the number 2 engine nacelle and out to the number 1 engine which had been shut down. There he removed the generator which had caught fire, anchored it to the wing and then returned through the wing to his station in the cabin. During this time we were at 9000 feet and the plane, under three engines, had lost only ten knots of speed!

 

Tachikawa AB Chapel

Billy Graham visited Tachikawa AB in 1956.  Charles is on the right

Sometime in the summer of 1956, my Dad was transferred from the chaplain’s office at Tachikawa to the chaplain’s office at Johnson Air Base. Actually, it was a pretty good promotion for him.  So we moved across from one side of Tokyo to the other to Johnson Air Base, which was a beautiful facility.  We moved into a three-bedroom, four-plex there, where we had a little more room to spread out.  The middle two houses were two-story.  The second story had three bedrooms and one bath.  There was a large storage closet.  It was big enough for only one twin bed – that was my bedroom.

Credit Google Search and bobp31-Homestead-FHA

 

The Wills Family, Base housing, Johnson AB, Japan

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Fred Remembers-Part 13

18 Nov

SUNDAY MEMORIES

 Judy Wills

 

Shortly after we were settled in Danville, Dad took off for Japan.  We waited patiently, expecting it to be a long wait (for us to join him in Japan); however, one of the serendipities was that the powers-that-be on the Air Force Base in Tokyo had arranged to alleviate the housing shortage by allowing selected people to actually build a small house on the property just adjacent to the base.  It was leased property, and we could build the house and then sell it when we left, to somebody else who would eventually then sell it to the Japanese.

So, I believe it was for about $3,300 Dad built, or had built, a three-bedroom, single bath house – no garage.

 

Charles at the back of the house

Front of the house

It was done sometime in either April or May of 1955.  So instead of having an 18-month wait, we had a much shorter wait.  In early May, we got on a ship in Oakland, California, and 21 days later, arrived in Yokohama, Japan.  That was an interesting trip, itself (more on this later).

We enjoyed the little house there in Tachikawa AFB, in Japan.  We lived on base in one of 10 or 12 small houses on the edge of the base, right next to a Sentry Dog training area.

Charles wrote:   While waiting for the house to be built, I lived in the BOQ, of course, which had the advantage of being close to the Officers Club where I took all my meals. The food there was excellent and cheap. The club dues were something like $2.00 per month, and for that we received one dinner per month free!  The Tachi O’Club was also famous for “Smily” and his orchestra which was also very good.

 

 

Credit Google Search and Fiveprime

 

Dad had the 1955 Chevy shipped over to Japan.  He had to drive on the left side, like the British. After less than one year, a taxi company offered to pay full price for the car.  If it had been plain black and standard transmission, they would have paid double the price offered.

After Dad sold the Chevy to the taxi company, Dad bought a second-hand 1950 Buick  station wagon “Woody” – with wood on the sides.  It was a bucket of bolts, and we didn’t travel in it very much.  Most of our trips were made by train.

We had a lot of interesting experiences in Japan.  In the time before we got there, Dad had discovered that one of the things the Japanese had done was a lot of construction.  A 2-3 hour trip of about 50 miles away in the mountains west of Tokyo, they were building a dam, called the Ogochi Dam.  At that time, I think, it was about the fifth or sixth largest dam in the world.  We could go out there on an excursion on Saturday or Sunday and watch them build it. It was an adventure just to drive out there, because the roads were in terrible shape, with huge potholes, some that would almost swallow up a whole car.  But we usually made it out there safely, and enjoyed the scenery en route. The drive and the dam were quite spectacular.

 

Photo credit wikipedia

 

Charles wrote:  Tachikawa was a lovely assignment. The religious program was full and satisfying.  We were comfortable in our little home and on base.  We were close enough to downtown Tokyo to get there by rail or to drive there on avenues K or L.  We drove down Japan Highway #1 to Oiso for a day at the beach and on another occasion drove to the Gohra hot springs area where we enjoyed the baths, and our children could climb Mount Fuji.  We drove north to the resort city of Karuizawa, on wretched roads, to see our daughter Emily enjoy a stay with friends there.  Our favorite drive on a Sunday afternoon was to see the Ogochi dam, following a winding river road in the mountains.  For a trip in winter time we took the Romantic Railroad to Nikko and enjoyed several days on the ski slopes with a chaplain friend and his family.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Fred Remembers~Part 12

11 Nov

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

Charles wrote:   Late in 1954, I received orders assigning us to Far East Air Forces.  So we were being moved to Japan.  

We left Tyndall in the winter of 1955, on February 1st, with the temperature being 28̊.  We headed West on U.S. 98 in ground fog.  The fog was right at windshield level.  We drove across country through Texas – and it took two days to across Texas! [that was before interstate roads] – then  across New Mexico and Arizona to Yuma, Arizona.

Charles wrote:   On our first day out of Tyndall heading to the west coast, we arrived in Beaumont, Texas in late afternoon.  Going through the city, we happened to be the last vehicle in the line to go through a light.  Unfortunately, a beer truck following us, also attempted to go through, but went too fast, and when we got into the next block discovered he didn’t have room to stop, so he crashed into our new Buick, bending the trunk lid.  Kitty had her sewing machine in the trunk, and she was concerned about that, but more about the children.  The driver came to apologize, but Kitty yelled at him, “what are you trying to do….kill my children??”  He arranged that very day to have a check cut for repairs for our car, so we continued on out to the west coast.

 

 Charles and Kitty with Sally by house on Beacon Beach, Tyndall AFB, Florida

1953 Buick, light green bottom, dark green on top

I think we ended up spending a few days with my Aunt and Uncle and cousins – I think at that time they were in Pasadena, California.  We drove up to Danville, California, which is just east of Oakland in the San Francisco Bay area.  Dad found a place for us to rent.

I think that, just a few days after we arrived in Danville, Dad decided to trade in his car – the 1953 Buick that was rear-ended – on a 1955 Chevrolet V-8 which was coral and gray.  It was an interesting car, and we really enjoyed it.

 

Emily and Sally by the coral and gray 1955 Chevy

We got in a three-bedroom house in Danville, south of Walnut Creek, California. It was a very affluent area, near Mt. Diablo.  Us kids were enrolled in the schools there.  I attended San Ramón Valley Union High School.  It was a new building.  I was quite disappointed to find they didn’t teach any Latin at all, or Algebra 2. They only had Business Math.  So I took two hours of study hall.  I had to take spelling again, something I hadn’t had to take since the fourth grade!  I was not impressed with the California schools.  We went to Japan during my second semester of my 10thgrade.  Since I could not take Latin and Algebra 2 while we were in Danville, I had to take them both during summer school in Tokyo.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Fred Remembers~Part 10

28 Oct

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 

In Biloxi, I remember having my first soft ice cream from an ice cream stand called Frosty Fred’s.

I remember that, while we were in Biloxi, I used to go fishing from a public pier, with a cane pole, using dead shrimp as bait, out in the Gulf [of Mexico] itself, and also in the bay behind the base. (Keesler AFB)

 

 

I used to catch a lot of croaker, some spade fish,

Atlantic Spadefish – credit Google Search and Wikipedia

and occasionally what we called sea trout, which is what my Dad called weak fish, which is what it was called up in New Jersey.

 

Sea Trout – credit Google Search and By No machine-readable author provided. Wolfgang Striewski assumed (based on copyright claims).

Anyway, I used to catch a bunch of fish, take it home and clean it, and eat it myself. I shared it with the rest of the family, too, of course.

I remember while we were in Biloxi, I went to one of the schools there.  I was in the 5thgrade.  As I recall, I think I was the only boy who’s voice had changed, so in music class I had to sing baritone by myself – and was very embarrassed about it. The other boys were singing something called Cambiata, which was a strange mixture for boys who’s voice is in the process of changing.  I also played the harmonica.  That was at Howard Elementary School.

Fred – 1950-1951 – Howard Elementary School

Fred – 1951 – with Keesler AFB Chaplain

1951 – of course by this time the Korean War had started, and Keesler had gone from a few thousand to, I think, over 30,000 troops almost overnight.

Dad said:   During that year, my mother took the train down to visit us and was with us for a month. Everyone was very nice to Mama, and she thoroughly enjoyed her stay with us.  I remember that shortly before she came down, the Korean War broke out, and our base went from 13,000 to 33,000 almost over night.  As a result, our chapels were filled with new airmen.  My mother had wanted me to get out of the service, and return to a civilian pastorate.  I took her to the chapel one morning, and placed her on the first pew so that she could see for herself the ministry I was in.  Soon she was enveloped by hundreds of young airmen.  She found the chapel full of airmen, some were standing along the sides of the building, some were seated on the chancel in front of the chapel, and there were even some looking in the windows from outside the chapel. After that, there was no more talk about my getting out of the service.

But they also needed some other training bases, and one of them happened to be Tyndall AFB over in Panama City, Florida, and Dad was transferred over there in 1951.  So we piled in the car and, by this time I believe, Dad had traded in his Oldsmobile for a 1950 Buick, which was considerably bigger and roomier and had four doors, which for six of us was a much more comfortable car.

 

Photo credit WJHG.com
 Credit Google search

We drove over to Panama City.  For a while, we lived in a place called Victory Circle, if I remember right, which was right downtown, right near the harbor in Panama City.  As I recall, it was either a four-unit or six-plex, and it was very old and crumbly.  Eventually we bought a new house at 107 Cove Lane.  I think it cost about $7,000 for a three-bedroom, one-car garage, and one bathroom house.  There was no yard to speak of, only some grass in the front yard, and weeds in the back. One day I saw rain in the front of the house, while it was dry in the back.

While living on Cove Lane, I had a friend who had a paper route. While he was gone, he would let me do it for him.  When it came time to collect for the delivery, I found that I had the most difficult time collecting from the Major of Panama City.  Sometimes dogs would harass and chase me as I delivered the papers. I loaded a squirt gun with ammonia and would squirt them in the face.  No more harassment.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Fred Remembers-Part 9

21 Oct

  SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

 In late 1949, my Dad was given the opportunity to switch over to the Air Force from the Army.  It wasn’t a requirement, but he said, “Well, wherever you want me , I’ll go.”  So they cut orders to transfer him over to the Air Force.

Charles (Dad) wrote: 

During1949 the Adjutant General of the Army put out a request to all Army chaplains holding Regular Commissions to indicate whether or not they would accept transfer to the new Chaplain Service of the Air Force.  I had tried for seven years to get into military aviation so I replied that I had been happy in the Army but would accept such a transfer.  Shortly before we left Trieste I received notice that I was one of 186 chaplains to form the cadre of the Air Force……When we reached Fort Hamilton in New York, I processed through the Air Force personnel section and began a new kind of military service.

 We began our Air Force career.

So, when it was time for the three-year tour to be up, we left Italy, but this time, on a ship (the Elden H. Johnson) – down through the Adriatic, up through the Strait of Messina, across the northern Mediterranean, out through the Strait of Gibraltar.

 

Credit Google search and ibiblio

 

 

I was on the deck of the ship as we were approaching Gibraltar.

 

Credit Google Search and Financial Times

I could see Europe on the right side, and Africa on the left.  I remember between Gibraltar and the Azores, we went through the tail end of a hurricane.  Our little ship was only about 12,000 tons, so it was a small ship. It was pitching, I think they said, at least 30 degrees – so the decks were “awash.”  When the ship pitched forward, the screws were out of the water, and the entire ship shook like it was going to come apart.  Most of us stayed in our staterooms most of the time. I never got seasick because I didn’t eat much, but a lot of people did.

We ended up docking in New York after a 12-day trip.  As we entered New York harbor, we could see the Statue of Liberty, and Staten Island. 

 

Credit Google Search and National Park Service

We went to visit Dad’s family – at least his Mom, in Ocean View, New Jersey.  I remember that, sometime while he was there, Dad went to Millville, which is not too far away, and he came back with a demonstrator 1949 Oldsmobile Rocket 88. One of the distinctive things about it was, that for some reason, since it had been a demonstrator, it did not have wheel skirts for the back wheels.  Other than that, it was a good car, and I think it was his first ever V-8.

 

The Wills Family, Biloxi, MS

We ended up driving it down to Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi.  After staying a few days in the Palm Hotel, which was right on the beach in Biloxi, we were eventually put up in an old, left-over, World War II barracks on the base. It was a fairly uncomfortable place, because there was no air conditioning.  There was one big fan at end of the building, which drew some air through it – moving through it, but it wasn’t too good.  Fortunately, it was just a few months until they put us in some new housing which had been built.  That was much nicer.

 

Fred – 1949-1950 school picture – – Howard Elementary School, Biloxi, MS

 

Dad’s Kodak Retina camera was stolen while we were in the Palm Hotel in Biloxi.

 

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

JUDYJudy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years
Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing.
Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.
After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.
She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins.
She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.
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