Tag Archives: Family Life

Church-Part 3

18 Sep

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

As I mentioned last time, we were in northern Maine only one year – 13 months actually.  The day following our daughter’s birth, Fred looked at me and said, “you don’t really want to stay here another year, do you?”  I nearly jumped out of the hospital bed, with a resounding “YOU GOT ORDERS!!”  And he did.  We were to go to San Antonio, Texas, for Fred to teach at the Officer Training School at Lackland AFB.

Credit Google Search and JBSA website

And so we transitioned from Maine to Texas, with some stops along the way.  We visited Fred’s parents and family in D.C. and New Jersey;

Fred’s grandmother and family

With Fred’s mother in D.C. (Dad taking the picture)

We visited my brother’s family in Titusville, Florida (my mother had remarried five years after, daddy’s death, and they were on their honeymoon in Florida), a stop at St. Augustine, Florida,

St. Augustine, FL – Judy, Karen and baby Janet

before heading to Texas.  I had some family in San Antonio, on my mother’s side, and we were able to stay with Aunt Lillie, while we looked for a house.

Aunt Lillie with Karen and Janet

There was a family stationed at Lackland that we had known in Wiesbaden.  They invited us to visit their church, which we did.  It was a relatively small church, and the husband led the choir.  Since he knew I played the piano, he asked me to play for the Christmas program for his choir…which I did.  However, once again, we didn’t feel that church was exactly where God wanted us to be.  So we visited some others in the general area.

My mother had spent quite a bit of time growing up in different areas of Texas and Oklahoma, and had been a secretary at the First Baptist Church in downtown San Antonio for many years.  During that same time my dad was Associate Sunday School Secretary for the Southern Baptists in Texas, and he made many trips to San Antonio.  I believe he told me he was teased quite a bit from his fellow workers about all the trips he “needed” to make to San Antonio after he met mom.  In any case, they had quite a few friends from that church.

Daddy

And so, being a good daughter, I called one of mother’s best friends from that church.  She was glad to hear from me.  After chatting a while, she asked if we had found a church home yet.  At my “no,” she quite forcefully said, “don’t you join anywhere until you visit First Baptist Church!”  So we agreed that we would meet up with her that following Sunday at FBC.  

For the first time in my life, as I walked in that huge church, the feeling was….home.  I knew almost instantly that THIS church was where God wanted us to be for the next three years.  I don’t believe I’ve had that definite a feeling about any church since.  It was a wonderful and warm feeling, and I loved it.

We joined the church…we joined the choir… we joined the Sunday School that was in our age group.  It was just a wonderful time in our lives.  I was also involved with the Young Women’s Fellowship Group.  To find more about that, please refer back to my post of September 19, 2021 “Friendship.”  It tells about the church, as well as that group and what we did in the community.

First Baptist Church San Antonio, TX, Sanctuary – from a post card

We thoroughly enjoyed our time in that church.  We didn’t much care for the 30-minute drive to-and-back home from downtown, but we learned that we make time for what we want to do.  And attending that church was what we wanted to do.

I started this series with a question: “…do you love to GO to church?”  Well, this church had us in its hands, and we LOVED to GO to church.  It was a fantastic experience.

WE….ARE THE CHURCH!

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~i

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

My Mother’s Chair

8 Sep

On the Porch

Onisha Ellis

My mom and dad had matching easy chairs. I inherited one of them. It’s not in the best of shape, but I can’t seem to part with it. A lot of good memories are tethered to the chair. But there is one not so good memory, or so it seemed at the time.

As my mom aged, I lent a hand with the housekeeping. One of the chores I found annoying was dusting their dual level end tables. I think when my parents passed to Glory, we donated them to a local charity. They are now called mid-century collectibles and I found this picture on Etsy. If you like mid-century, check out their store, this one is handmade! The picture below is a modern version.

Back to the annoying part…dusting was easy but moving all the stuff my mom kept scattered all over it was a pain. I frequently murmured internally, “geez mom, can’t you put stuff away?” Hand creams, foot creams, nail files, peanut butter crackers that she called “nabs”, lottery scratch off tickets, a magnifying glass..you get the picture. Some items I would return to their proper places but for the most part, I moved them, dusted and put them back.

I didn’t get then why she was so messy but having just attained septuagenarian status, I am beginning to get it. One, my septuagenarian self tires more easily than my forty-ish self. Why put something away that I am going to have to go back and get. Two and this is the big one for me, if something gets put away, there is a good chance I might not remember where I put it!

Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay

I was thinking this week that mom would have gotten a kick out of seeing my messy self now.

One of our friends made up this cool gift for my big 7-0. On each dollar bill she placed a Post-it note with a birthday message on it.

The length of the one dollar bills brought to mind Proverbs 3:1-2

My son, do not forget my teaching,
but let your heart keep my commandments,
for length of days and years of life
and peace they will add to you.

I'm a winner

After my retirement, I decided to re-learn the canning and preserving skills I learned from my mother but hadn’t practiced for twenty years. I titled the blog Old Things R New to chronicle my experience.  Since then I have been blessed to have six other bloggers join me, DiVoran Lites, Bill Lites,  Judy Wills, Louise Gibson, Janet Perez Eckles and Melody Hendrix

In addition to blogging, I work as the publicist/marketer/ amateur editor and general  “mom Friday” for my author daughter, Rebekah Lyn. I also manage her website, Rebekah Lyn Books  

My 2022 goal is continue to use my love of photographs and words to be an encourager on social media.

Church

4 Sep

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

Do you love church?  I mean, do you love to GO to church?

When most people say “let’s go to church” they are usually referring to the church building they attend.

Far too often, we have forgotten that the church building is just that…a building where believers gather together to worship.

And far too often, we forget that it is the believers that gather within that church building who are the church.  The building is just a convenient place to gather.

I want to make a disclaimer here – I am about to show in pictures some of the church buildings where I have attended.  But I realize that they are just buildings.  It is the body of believers within those buildings that I have loved.  And so….

I have been involved with many churches throughout my life.  I was born in Dallas, Texas, and my family attended the First Baptist Church there.  Since we moved away just before I was four-years-old, I have only faint memories of that building or believers.  Fred and I have been back to visit and tour that campus, but it raises no memories to me. (firstdallas.or

FBC Dallas, Texas

FBC Dallas, Texas – photo by Judy Wills

The church we attended in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where we moved to from Texas, was the First Baptist Church. That body of believers established themselves as the First Baptist Church of Albuquerque in 1853.  It was been an active church ever since.  The congregation has now built a new building in which to worship.  It is quite modern and up-to-date, and from the pictures I looked at online, it is a growing body with many believers.  I am thrilled.  (fbcabq.com)

As I look at the picture below, I am almost in tears.  That building was my first experience with “church” and it holds many memories dear to my heart.  My family attended that building every Sunday that I can remember.  We had Sunday School there in the classrooms, a room where the choir met before going into the Sanctuary choir loft, and the Sanctuary itself.  I sang in the children’s choirs all the way up to the Adult Choir.  I was baptized there.  Fred and I met and were married in that building.  Dear to my heart, indeed.

Photo credit First Baptist Church, Albuquerque

First Baptist Church, Albuquerque, New Mexico Credit Goggle Search

After we married, we moved to Fort Worth, Texas, where we joined the Travis Avenue Baptist Church.  The body of believers in that congregation was quite large, so most of our friendships revolved around the Sunday School classes, and the choir.  It was a wonderful time in our lives, and I feel we both grew, spiritually during that time. (travis.org)

Travis Avenue Baptist Church

Credit Google Search

Fred was attending the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, at the time, in preparation for a life of full-time ministry.  God had other plans for us, but those years in the Seminary prepared us both for other ministries.

SWBTS

Credit Google Search

When Fred entered the U.S. Air Force, he (we) were sent to San Jose, California, for Fred to study Meteorology at San Jose State College (now University). 

San Jose State University

Credit Google Search and San Jose State University website

 We were to be there for only one year of study – from June to June.  We attended several different churches before finding the one we felt God wanted us to join.  One of the churches we visited was pastored by a man who was a friend of my father’s. (Baptist Temple)  Fred and I had just about decided to join another church, when this man and his wife came to visit us.  They were quite insistent that we belonged to their congregation – Fred with his Seminary training could assist with the Sunday School program.  With my music training, I could play either the piano or organ.  So we decided to join – to their relief.  However, we found out quite quickly that it was NOT where God wanted us to be.  While we made friends and worshiped there, we were unsettled the entire time we were in San Jose.  Fortunately, it was only for one year.  But we learned our lesson – we never again joined a church without absolutely knowing that was the church where God wanted us to serve.

WE ARE THE CHURCH!

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Min’s Cafe-Part 6

29 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

School

When we were in fifth grade, we were consolidated. For all the years the valley had been populated, the children had tiny schools scattered over the valley. Some of them were far away from the ranch, and the children had to walk through snow drifts to get to school and home again. The names of the schools were the names of the ranchers that built them. There were twenty-six school districts in the relatively small valley. 

Image by Jo Justino from Pixabay

We were taken to Silvercliff on a bus instead of walking to school. I recall one time when the whole class, oh about six people, had to walk because the bus was unavailable. That was fun; we laughed and played the whole mile to the Silvercliffe school. 

I recall riding a bus out to a ranch with some of our ranch friends. Their lives were very different from ours, considering the amount of work they had to do. At one of the farms, I saw my first different child who could not attend school because he had Down’s syndrome. That made me very sad. I must have eaten something I wasn’t used to at another ranch because I got sick. Another place I recall was where I couldn’t get out of bed in the middle of the night. There was furniture around the children’s bed, and I couldn’t get out in the dark. I suppose I went back to sleep and managed to “hold it” until dawn.

Back in town, we had town dances at two different places. One was the upper room of the only grocery store (which in future years was blown off the building). The other was the basketball area at the high school. I loved those dances. We were taken to one of the old ranch schools for a square dance. 

During the town dances, Mrs. Erps played a honky tonk piano. The town quilters had made a beautiful quilt for someone who stopped in the right ring that was painted on the floor. I was thrilled down to my toes when my little brother and I, walking around, stopped in the right place. The quilt had a blue background with flowers and a yellow backing. All the names of the quilter were stitched into the quilt. I was thrilled, but my brother did not need it, so he gave me his half. It wore completely out decades later.

Our parents stayed at the restaurant during the dances, and the people came for refreshments. Mother and Daddy would casually ask, “How are those kids of ours doing?” They were assured the kids were doing fine and having a good time. Everybody looked after everyone else in those days and at that place.

Susie Luthi, whose father had the hotel, taught the children’s Sunday School at the church where Mother sent us. She was sixteen, and I was twelve. She got polio and was sick for a very long time. She asked me if I would take over the teaching because I was the only child interested in the Bible. We only had five children in the class. Over the time of my life, I have taught Sunday school for many years. The last time I saw Susie was at a school reunion not too many years ago, and she was still beautiful and sweet.  

My best friend Patience and I both won a trip to Denver. Mine was for writing a Colorado Young Citizens League speech contest that year, and her’s was for winning the spelling bee at her level. The speeches were about the history of education in Colorado. 

Patience and I had our first banana split at an ice cream parlor. We climbed up on the stools to sit at the marble fountain counter. We ordered the first banana split either of us had ever tasted.

Image by Hans Schwarzkopf from Pixabay

It was terrific, but we couldn’t eat it all. Just as we had vowed to be friends even when we were grandmothers (which we are), we vowed never to forget the ice cream, banana pieces, and syrup left in the bottom of the dish. I’ve only had about three banana splits and never could finish one. At one time, Bill’s sister and her husband shared one with us at a Dairy Queen. The four of us didn’t have any trouble polishing that one off. 

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Chicken Pox and Shingles

28 Aug

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

I don’t believe I had the chicken pox when I was a child – at least I don’t remember having it.  

Credit Pixabay

Measles (German measles), yes, and strep throat a LOT…but not chicken pox.  My brother, Bill thinks he had chicken pox – and the mumps – as a child.  He also said: “Oh yes, and I also had shingles as an adult. Terrible disease!”

Credit Pixabay

I know that my husband Fred, had chicken pox, because there is a “chicken pox pit” in each of his face cheeks.  It must have been a really bad case of it, poor thing.  I must admit – I don’t even “see” them anymore.  

When our Karen was a little thing, chicken pox ran rampant through the church.  I had hoped she would get it (is that a terrible thing for a mother to wish for?), and get that particular childhood disease behind her.  But she never did – until she was 14 years old!  Sorry Karen – I know that embarrasses you, but it’s good for this story. She was quite embarrassed back then, as well.  Because she knew of the “pits” in Fred’s face, she made sure she didn’t scratch any blisters on her face.  But she said there was one in her hair that she scratched a lot!

Our Janet was exposed to chicken pox when she was five-years-old, and came down with a fairly light case of it.  I picked her up, held her right in front of her daddy’s face, and said, “do you want holes in your face, like Daddy has?”  She replied no, so I told her to NEVER to scratch any of the blisters on her face!!  And she didn’t.

Janet, age 5

Well, either she and I were exposed at the same time, or I caught the virus from her, because at the same time she had chicken pox, I had a light case of shingles!  I say “light” because it manifested itself on my back in a patch about the size of a silver dollar!

Credit Google Search – Eisenhower Silver Dollar

Lots of blisters, and all that goes along with chicken pox/shingles, and it was not a lot of fun!  However, from what I’ve heard from other people,  I am very grateful for my “light” case!  An interesting footnote to my “light” case – that “patch” on my back is still “numb” – even after all these years.  I guess it killed the nerve endings in that spot.  Amazing.

I remember when Fred’s mother had a case of shingles.  It landed in her face, nearly reaching her eye.  I’m told that, if it gets in the eye, it can cause blindness.  We were grateful that it did not reach her eye!  I’ve heard so many horrible stories about shingles.  It is not a friendly disease!

Later, when I was going through chemo for breast cancer, my doctor was almost in a panic that I hadn’t had either the pneumonia shot or the shingles shot.  She said it would be a “disaster” if I were to get either disease while going through chemo!  So I was given both of those shots.

I guess that’s a good thing, because when our grandtwins were about one year old, we made a trip to Virginia to visit with the family.  One evening Janet and Tom went out – a rare date since the twins arrived – and Fred and I kept the twins.  They had both been fussy most of the day, and Connor was crying so hard and consistently, that I grabbed him up, settled us both in the recliner, and let him sleep on my chest.  When Janet and Tom returned the next morning and got a look at the twins, we realized they had “spots” all over them.  Sure enough – it was chicken pox!  So glad I had taken that shingles shot!  We never really determined where the twins picked up the virus, except they had been at the YMCA taking swimming lessons.  It’s possible, I guess.

Well, the latest info on shingles (which they keep saying that at our age we REALLY need that shot!) is that they have developed a new – and better – shingles shot, but it is a two shot procedure.  We’ve taken the first one, but haven’t been informed as to when we need the second one.  Seems a bit hap-hazard to me, hm?

I’m also told that the shingles/chicken pox virus remains in the body for a lifetime.  Now THAT’s a scary thought!

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia

19 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

Recently, Fred and I made a trip to Virginia to see our youngest daughter, her husband, and our grandtwins.  We always love being with them.  They live in Williamsburg, but not in the restored colonial area.  But every time we visit there, we always walk through the restored area.

When we returned Stateside from Heidelberg, West Germany in 1983, Fred was stationed at Langley AFB, Hampton, Virginia.  Neither of us had ever lived in Virginia, so it was to prove to be a new and exciting experience for both of us – actually all four of us, since our daughters were still living at home.

We were excited to realize that we lived just eight miles from Yorktown, and that is within the “Historic Triangle” of Williamsburg, Yorktown, and Jamestown.  That area is just oozing with American history.  While that had not been much of an interest to me prior to our time in Virginia, I found myself totally engaged in it.

And Colonial Williamsburg helped that viewpoint.  In that vein, we purchased what they called the “Patriot Pass” – essentially an annual pass.  Since we lived only about 30 minutes from Colonial Williamsburg, we went there often – so often that our girls grew a bit tired of it.  Not only did we take them with us, but their schools had field trips there, as well.  Eventually, we felt we had seen just about everything they had to offer, and let our Patriot Pass lapse.  We could still walk the streets and see the gardens and shops, but we couldn’t go into the “attractions” where the “interpreters” told what was going on in their areas in colonial times.  

All that to say, this time when we visited, we decided to get the Patriot Pass and go through as many of the attractions as possible.  We are so glad we did – it was new and refreshing to hear the explanations of what was done in those areas, by people dressed in period costumes, and telling just what it might be like in colonial times to do their jobs.  

We stopped at the seamstress shop (I was especially interested in how they got the printed fabric),

Trend & Tradition – Autumn 2021

 The printer

Credit National Graphic – Visiting Our Past – America’s Historylands

The apothecary, the boot and shoemaker,

Credit National Graphic – Visiting Our Past – America’s Historylands

 The Capitol, 

Credit Williamsburg Before and After

The blacksmith among others.

Credit Military Lifestyle – March 1992

The tour of Raleigh’s Tavern was especially interesting, as we were told it was the birthplace of Phi Beta Kappa!  And there was a gentleman walking the Duke of Gloucester Street, dressed in period costume (along with a yes-man sidekick) who told about how his house was so much better than his brother’s house.  Just delightful!

Credit Trend & Tradition – Winter 2022

We had hoped to go through the Governor’s Palace, but the line was exceedingly too long, with about five or six groups ahead of us.  By the time we were on our way back there, we were both too tired, and skipped that one.

Credit Military Lifestyle – March 1992

We wanted to go in the Bruton Parish Church (that’s BRuton not Burton!!),

Credit Williamsburg Before and After

 which we had seen quite often, but it was closed that day.  It is still an active Anglican church, and was the site of many of the country’s beginnings.  It is especially beautifully decorated at Christmas time.  Just a note here – all the private residences within Colonial Williamsburg, as well as all the stores and attractions, are required to decorate the outsides of their facilities/houses, and it must be all living decorations – no silk flowers or fake fruit – it must be real.  It’s amazing what they come up with.

Credit Trend & Tradition – Winter 2022

Credit Trend & Tradition – Autumn 2021

The Capitol is at one end of the Duke of Gloucester Street, and Merchant’s Square is at the other end, just across the street from the Wren Building on the College of William and Mary.  Many shops and eateries there, which are fun to patronize.  Duke of Gloucester Street is about one mile long.

Here is a book we purchased titled Williamsburg Before and After.  Many of the pictures in this post are from that book. 

Duke of Gloucester Street – 1928

I am so glad someone decided to restore this area!

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

I Don’t Speak Portuguese!

12 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

Re-blogged

One of the funniest things – and most irritating – about growing up in New Mexico, is that a whole LOT of the U.S. population doesn’t even know New Mexico is one of our great 50! So much so, that the New Mexico Magazine has published a book of anecdotes people have shared. It, as well as a full-page article in the magazine, is entitled One Of Our 50 Is Missing. I have laughed – and growled – over some of the things people have encountered in this vein.

I never thought to have one of those experiences myself, but sure enough – it happened to me!

Some years ago, after we returned stateside from Germany, we were living in the small town of Seaford, Virginia. It is a lovely little place, just eight miles away from Yorktown, which is part of the Historical Triangle in Virginia. That triangle encompasses Yorktown, Colonial Williamsburg, and Jamestown.

There happened to be a Baptist Church in Seaford, and after “visiting around” the other churches in the Hampton Roads area, we decided Seaford Baptist Church was where God wanted us, so we joined the church.

Within the first year, our church hosted a youth group from Tennessee. Seems like the man who had served Seaford Baptist Church as a volunteer youth pastor was a military person, and had been reassigned to a military base in Tennessee shortly before we arrived on the scene. And he volunteered as youth pastor for the little church they joined there. He brought his youth group to Seaford, and we provided the beds and food for the youth. Since our house contained four bedrooms and three full baths, we signed up for two girls. One of our bedrooms and bathrooms was downstairs, which made it nice for company to have their own bedroom and bathroom. So our assigned girls stayed there. Turns out, they were both named Kim.

The week went by quite quickly, and we enjoyed their company a lot. The night before they were to depart for Tennessee, we were all gathered in the kitchen, just sharing and talking. One of the girls stated that she didn’t think she would go on the youth trip the following year. Why not, I asked? Well, Max wants to take us to New Mexico, and I don’t want to go. Why not, I asked again? Well, I DON’T SPEAK PORTUGUESE! WHAT???……Portuguese? Well, they speak some foreign language out there, and I just don’t want to go!

Yep…….one of our 50 is missing!

Now, I may not – at that time – have been able to tell you exactly WHERE Tennessee was located on a map (I can now), but I most certainly knew that Tennessee is one of our 50 states! Makes me wonder what the geography teachers in Tennessee are teaching!

                                               

I Corinthians 10:26

for the earth is the Lord’s, and all it contains.

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

The Seamstresses in My House-Final

5 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

I really didn’t do much more sewing after that – mostly just repair work.  And that continues even today.

Somewhere along the way, when we lived in Panama City, Florida, I purchased a Bernina sewing machine from a store in town.  It wasn’t the top-of-the-line, but it was still an amazing machine!  I still have it.  One thing that impressed me about it, was that it could go “from nylon to leather in one stitch.”  I’ve never had to try that, but it is still an amazing machine.

Credit Pixabay Images

At the same store, they offered classes in sewing.  I had Karen take a class once, and she made a pillow case and a nightgown in the same nylon fabric – in lavender.  She wore that nightgown for many years.  Apparently it was quite comfortable.  Unfortunately, she hasn’t done much sewing since then.

Here is a picture of us in Albuquerque, at the Sunport, just before we headed off to Heidelberg, Germany in 1980.  The top I have on is one that I did make, and liked it very much.  Short sleeves, but a cowl neckline.  Cotton and polyester blend.  Very comfortable.  I believe I made the slacks I had on, out of polyester as well.

Here’s a picture of Janet and a dress I made for her when she was in high school.  As I recall, it was made out of polyester fabric.

But one of the things I enjoyed most, was making this bedspread, dust ruffle, matching curtains for both windows in Karen’s room in Heidelberg.  I think I had the pink-and-white gingham cotton fabric when we went to Germany.  The bedspread was out of already-quilted cotton fabric.  I had already made the bedspread and dust ruffle for her bed in Virginia.  But when we got to Germany, I discovered an entire bolt of the cotton eyelet lace, and I purchased the entire bolt, and added it to the curtains.  It made a lovely addition to the curtains.  Karen was thrilled.

As I said earlier, I’ve really not done much true sewing recently.  Not that I’ve lost my love of sewing, but just haven’t found the time or inclination to do so.

However, it’s been a nice journey throughout my lifetime.  I hope you’ve enjoyed my ramblings, and the pictures that have gone with them.

~~~~~~~~~~The End~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

From Dreaded to Delightful

24 Feb

On the Porch

Onisha Ellis

Since January I have been ignoring a date on my calendar. February 23, 2022. For months my time has revolved around caring for my husband. Taking him to doctors, finding a specialist, sending medical reports, coordinating appointments and managing the “arranging” of life. I didn’t feel I had time for February 23rd and truth be told, I was a bit afraid.

At my annual checkup with a specialist in January, the doctor suggested I undergo a diagnostic procedure, as a precaution. My initial thought was I don’t have time for this. Then I remembered that a cousin close to my age had died from a cancer my doctor was concerned about. I agreed to the test but pushed it until late February . I was just too busy.

The day before the procedure I was feeling all grumpy. In the past when my husband or I had to go to this particular diagnostic center, it seemed an appointment time was merely a suggestion. My procedure required nothing to eat or drink after midnight and I don’t do well without food and morning coffee.

Photo Credit-My husband taken at The Ark Encounter

Mid-afternoon the center called and asked if they could move my time to 7 am. Along with not doing well with the hangries. I am not an early morning person. I would have to wake up at 5:30 am.

Ark Encounter

Just as I was about to say no way, sanity hit me. 7 am would make me one of the first cases. No hours wait because they were running behind schedule. I could give up sleep for that perk.

From the time I woke, February 23rd turned from dreaded too delightful. I woke before my alarm and spent some time reading scripture and meditating on it. That always makes my day better. My daughter drove me to the diagnostic center in a nearby town. Traffic was light and we even had green lights at most of the traffic signals.

Once at the center, the staff was friendly and on time. Even the IV line went in smoothly. Not a bit of bruising either. The procedure went well and no signs of cancer were found. Hallelujah! And get this, next to the diagnostic center was a Dunkin Donuts and I really like their coffee.

After my coffee fix, I told my daughter I felt wide awake and let’s run her errands and have some fun. Our first stop was a discount store we had been wanting to visit and look for bargain books. We found some bargains but didn’t buy a single book.

Then it was back in the car to drive to another town to pick up a ship to store order. My original cup of coffee was history and we were both wanting more and as luck would have it, there was a coffee cafe, Bold Cup Coffee a few stores away from where the ship to store item was picked up.

I think it may have been new as neither of us had seen it before, We decided to give it a try and I am glad we did. We asked the barista what drink was her favorite. She recommended her families special brew, a Peruvian cafe con Leche. It was really good.

I think the caffeine was holding off the post-procedure sleepiness and I was ready for the next errand on my daughter’s list. So back on the road to yet another town to have her car serviced, washed, vacuumed and fill the gas tank. Oh, and the car dealership had free coffee, a brand named Jittery Joe. I had to try it but it didn’t come close to the flavor of the previous coffees.

With the errands complete we began to think about lunch. We didn’t see any place interesting along the interstate as we drove home so I decided we should splurge and dine at our local and famous seafood restaurant, Dixie Crossroads.

There was a twenty minute wait and the day was so beautiful, with a gentle breeze, we decided to wait outside. The restaurant has a small pond loaded with fish and turtles. The turtles were taking advantage of the beautiful day to get some sun.

My dreaded day became a delightful day shared with one of my favorite people.

I have become addicted to local roast. Who needs big chains? Well, except I really did enjoy my cup of Dunkin Donuts. Tomorrow we plan to try out a local coffee roaster close to our home. Can’t wait!

PS: Once we were home, I began to feel the effects of my morning anesthesia.I changed in Pjs and enjoyed a two hour nap!

Don’t be pulled in different directions or worried about a thing. Be saturated in prayer throughout each day, offering your faith-filled requests before God with over flowing gratitude. Tell him every detail of your life,

Philippians 4:6 The Passion Translation

I'm a winner

After my retirement, I decided to re-learn the canning and preserving skills I learned from my mother but hadn’t practiced for twenty years. I titled the blog Old Things R New to chronicle my experience.  Since then I have been blessed to have six other bloggers join me, DiVoran Lites, Bill Lites,  Judy Wills, Louise Gibson, Janet Perez Eckles and Melody Hendrix

In addition to blogging, I work as the publicist/marketer/ amateur editor and general  “mom Friday” for my author daughter, Rebekah Lyn. I also manage her website, Rebekah Lyn Books  

My 2021 goal is continue to use my love of photographs and words to be an encourager on social media.

Letters from Mother 11

9 Aug

My Take

DiVoran Lites

September 1, 1983

Photo credit Pixabay

Dear ones,

We’re at Mary and Jerry’s. Dad has gone hunting, and I’ve written one letter to Ivan Dab for his birthday. We had a good trip, with no problems. Thank you for writing us such a nice long letter. DiVoran it is so nicely written and so interesting. I’m a bit late with writing this time due to traveling.

We were so worried when the storm Barry came so close to you, and we kept track of it as it moved on by. 

Photo credit Pixabay

Billy’s clothes sound nice, and he sounds alive and well. Guess Renie’s back in school now, and things are getting all settled to a routine. Bet you’ll be thankful for some cool weather when it comes.

Mary’s house seems big, and she seems to be more organized this time. I’m anxious to get on home to warm weather.

Hope you and Bill have a lovely anniversary as usual. 

We Love you,

Mother and Dad

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

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