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Random Memories of Germany

10 Jan

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

Berlin-Part 1

We were able to visit Berlin several times while we lived in Germany – during each of our tours of duty in Germany.  We marveled at what we saw, each time we visited.  I remember (but not exactly when) I was describing being in Berlin and how much we enjoyed it, to the lady doing my hair.  I believe she was a German girl, working in the American beauty shop on base.  Her response surprised me, in that she said she didn’t think she could live in Berlin, since it was so “closed in” with the wall surrounding it.  And that thought surprised me!  I told her that Berlin was beautiful and felt quite “open” and not closed in at all!  But she was firm in her belief.  I was sorry I was unable to convince her.  The very air in Berlin feels like “hope” and freedom.

Our first visit was when my Mother came to Germany for a two-week visit in May, 1969.  We stayed in the hotel near Tempelhof Airport.

1969 – Tempelhof Airport.  U.S. Air Forces – Tempelhof  Central Airport

We were curious to see some sort of monument in front of the hotel, and later learned that it was a memorial to the Berlin Airlift.  And not only that, but it happened to be the 20th anniversary of the airlift.  The airlift, resulting from the Soviet blockade of the city in 1948, is quite a story unto itself.  I will not retell that story here, but would encourage my readers to Google “Berlin Airlift” and read about it there.  It was a major event in the Cold War, and Tempelhof was a major part of the story.

1969 – The Berlin Airlift Memorial monument. Judy in bright pink, Mother in blue.

We took a bus tour – to see the high points of the city, before we struck out on our own.  The Berlin Wall was up by that time, and we were unable to see the East side of Berlin, as it was controlled by the Soviet Union.  The difference between East and West Berlin was startling.  West Berlin was a modern, beautiful city, while the East side looked like a war zone still.  Amazing!

1969 – Looking into East Berlin from Checkpoint Charlie

One thing, especially, that fascinated me, was the ruins of Kaiser Wilhelm Kirche – right next to the new, beautiful Kirche.  I don’t have pictures of the new church during that time, so I don’t remember whether or not we went into the new church that visit.  But we did during our visit with our daughters in 1983.  It’s really beautiful.

Credit Google Search and art-days.com

It is along one of the main streets of West Berlin, Kurfurstendam, affectionately known as Ku’dam.

1969 – Looking down the Ku’dam at the old and new church

I had wondered why the ruins of the church were left there in the middle of the town.  I was told that the German people wanted it left – as a reminder of what war had done to their country – twice!  And to never instigate war again.  It is a vivid reminder!

The original Kaiser Wilhelm Kirche

Credit Google Search and Culture of Readers Journey – Edublogs

But there are some wonderful things to see there, as well.  We went to the Charlottenburg Palace.

1969 – The Charlottenburg Palace

1969 – The Charlottenburg Palace manicured grounds

In addition to all the “royal” stuff one might expect to see, we saw the original bust of Nefertiti in the museum.  There is much speculation as to why she is in Germany and not Egypt, but that’s another story, too.

1969 – the original Nefertiti bust

Walking along a lovely city street, we came upon an old hand-watering pump.  Apparently it is free water to any and all, and it looked like it was used by many to wash their cars there!  We showed it to our girls in our 1983 visit, as well.  Little things like that fascinate me!

1969 – the old hand-watering pump

1983 – the same pump. Karen, Judy and Janet

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Random Memories of Germany

3 Jan

The Doctor

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

When we lived in Heidelberg (1980-1983), we lived in an apartment building, furnished by the U.S. government.

Our apartment building – ours was the upper left, on the end

The dormer windows to the right were the maids rooms windows

It was a three-bedroom, one bathroom, living room/dining room combination room, and kitchen.  In our particular housing area (Mark Twain Village, or affectionately known as MTV), the buildings had “maids rooms” above one side of the stairwell – one room for each of the apartments in that stairwell – and the other side of the stairwell was open space.  We lived under the side that had the open space.  The maids room consisted of two twin beds, a desk with chair, and a wardrobe.  There was one bathroom along the hall for use by all the maids rooms.  That’s where we housed visitors that came to us.  Fortunately, I had grown up sleeping on twin beds, and had two twin bedspreads that fit nicely.  Unfortunately, that room became our “junk” room until someone came to visit, then we had to clean it out rather quickly.  But it worked.  Also, down in the basement were the washers and dryers (for the entire stairwell), and “cages” for anything we couldn’t fit in our apartment – bicycles, etc.

I don’t remember a lot of turn-over with occupants in the stairwell, while we were there.  That was a good thing.  The family living below us consisted of a military man and his wife, who was from France.  She was an excellent cook, and showed me many things that the French people cooked.  Unfortunately, none of it lasted with me!

Below this family, and on the first floor, lived a military doctor and his family.  He had grown up living in Brazil with his missionary parents, and spoke fluent Portuguese, as that is the language of that country.  He also spoke English.  His wife was Brazilian.  They attended our church.  I taught their oldest daughter the piano for a while.  She was amazing!!  His name was Dr. Lipsi.

There are two events that involved Dr. Lipsi while we were there:

1.  One day I was in our kitchen, with Janet, and was cutting some soft cheese for some snacks.

Credit Pixabay

Since it was soft cheese, and I was using a new cheese cutter (like the one in the picture), I “pushed” the cheese forward with my thumb.  Janet’s eyes grew wide and she exclaimed…”OH!!”  When I looked at my hand, I realized I had sliced quite a chunk off my thumb!  It was fairly deep, but I hadn’t even felt it!  I wrapped it in a towel, putting pressure on it, and ran down to see Dr. Lipsi.  He very generously took came of it – telling me to “keep pressure on it!”  Like I was about to let go!!

2.  Our Karen had started wearing contact lenses while we were in Heidelberg.

1980 – Judy, Janet and Karen with friends in D.C., before going to Germany

Karen in her glasses

1982 – Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, Germany, inside the Eagle’s Nest

Karen in contact lenses; Judy’s mother, Judy, Janet

One evening, as she was about to go out with friends, she came dashing back into the apartment in tears, saying that the wind had blown one of her contact lenses out of her eye, and she couldn’t find it!  She was in a panic about it, but fortunately, had a spare lense.  So she inserted it, and left with her friends.  When Dr. Lipsi heard the commotion, we told him the situation.  He took his flashlight, went outside, and FOUND THAT LENSE – in the dark evening, ON A BUSH!!  What persistence!!  We were so grateful.  We had just given up and thought it was gone for good.  WOW!

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

The Lesson of Shrek the Sheep

27 Dec

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

I frequently find something on facebook that I like to share.  The following is one of those items.  I hope you enjoy the story as much as I did.  It holds great meaning to me as a believer in our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

Judy

This is Shrek the sheep. He became famous several years ago when he was found after hiding out in caves for six years. Of course, during this time his fleece grew without anyone there to shorn (shave) it. When he was finally found and shaved, his fleece weighed an amazing sixty pounds. Most sheep have a fleece weighing just under ten pounds, with the exception usually reaching fifteen pounds, maximum. For six years, Shrek carried six times the regular weight of his fleece. Simply because he was away from his shepherd.

This reminds me of John 10 when Jesus compares Himself to a shepherd, and His followers are His sheep. Maybe it’s a stretch, but I think Shrek is much like a person who knows Jesus Christ but has wandered. If we avoid Christ’s constant refining of our character, we’re going to accumulate extra weight in this world—a weight we don’t have to bear.

When Shrek was found, a professional sheep shearer took care of Shrek’s fleece in twenty-eight minutes. Shrek’s sixty pound fleece was finally removed – enough wool to make suits for 20 men!  All it took was coming home to his shepherd.

I believe Christ can lift the burdens we carry, if only we stop hiding. He can shave off our ‘fleece’—that is, our self-imposed burdens brought about by wandering from our Good Shepherd.

Author unknown

“Come to Me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Matthew 11:28-30.

From Judy in 2020 – what a GREAT way to begin the new year!!

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

In the Fullness of Time

20 Dec

MEMORIES

Copied from facebook

I presented this post in January of 2017, but would like to re-blog it here for Christmas 2020.  And so…..

IN THE FULLNESS OF TIME

I know that Christmas 2016 is over [Christmas 2020 is approaching]  .  However, I wanted to share something a pastor friend sent to us as a Christmas card.  It touched both Fred and me greatly, and I hope it will touch your heart, as well.  (As way of acknowledgement, I’ve searched and not found this particular paraphrasing of these verses anywhere.  It could have been his own version of it)  It’s the best way to begin a New Year:

Galatians 4:4-5

4 – But when the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth His Son, made of a

woman, made under the law,

5 – To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

As we begin the month of December, our thoughts are about Christmas.  There is a phrase in Galatians 4:4.  This phrase is a powerful statement about the coming of God’s Son to earth.  The phrase in the fullness of the time (Galatians 4:4) refers to that time when the world was providentially ready for the birth of the Savior.

It was the RIGHT TIME for JESUS to come.  Historians tell us that in the Roman world the old religions were dying, the old philosophies were empty and powerless to change men’s lives.  Strange new mystery religions were invading the empire.  Religious bankruptcy and spiritual hunger were everywhere.  God was preparing the world for the arrival of His Son.

Roads connected city with city, and all cities ultimately with Rome.  Roman laws protected the rights of citizens, and Roman guards protected the peace – THE ROMAN PAX.

The Roman Empire, A.D. 117 – Credit Google Search

Thanks to both the Greek and Roman conquests, Latin and Greek were known across the empire.  He sent His Son to THE RIGHT PEOPLE.  It was no accident that God chose Abraham to be the father of His people!  God promised Abraham a nation to come from his seed (Genesis 12:1-3)

Jesus was born in THE RIGHT LAND.  It was no accident that Abraham left Ur (modern day Iraq) and journeyed to Canaan (present day Israel).  God’s people got off-track and stuck in Egypt, and so God sent a deliverer, Moses!  Then He had to get them out of Babylon and back to THE RIGHT LAND.

THE RIGHT LANGUAGE was available, and it was no accident that a man named Alexander (the Great) came 300 years before Christ, and spread the Hellenistic culture with most people knowing the Greek language and THE RIGHT CULTURE adopted by the Romans. 

Alexander the Great – Credit Google Search

Finally, it was under THE RIGHT LAW.  The new gospel would need to spread rapidly!  By the end of the first century, the Christian gospel had spread throughout the Roman Empire, reaching all the way to Great Britain!  God used the Roman Empire, as He did the Greeks, the Jews, and anyone else to make this TIME in history RIGHT!

JESUS came at the RIGHT TIME, to the RIGHT PEOPLE, in the RIGHT LAND, with the RIGHT LANGUAGE, and during the RIGHT CULTURE, and under the RIGHT LAW!

It was no accident when Jesus arrived in history, but rather God’s perfect timing in preparing our world for His coming.

It was truly in the fullness of time that God sent forth His Son.

With these words in mind, have a blessed Christmas season (and in this case – a wonderful and blessed New Year!).

[ in 2020 I would like to add a bit from Dr. David Jeremiah.  He is pastor of Shadow Mountain Community Church in San Diego, California. (www.DavidJeremiah.org)   He has a TV program called Turning Point.  I’ve not listened to his radio program, but I suspect it’s called Turning Point, as well.  He preaches God’s word, and we are blest every time we watch his TV program.  His organization publishes a monthly magazine and devotional guide called Turning Points.  I found the following in his daily e-mail, and it touched my heart.  I hope it touches yours, as well:

Because Christ came to earth for a specific time, we can be with Him in heaven for ages unlimited. What an incredible thought! Treasure every moment as you prepare for your eternal home with Him one day.

Judy – 2020

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Random Memories of Germany

13 Dec

WIESBADEN – PART 4

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

On our first trip to Holland, we took in the Keukenhof Gardens and their magnificent flowers – mostly tulips, but others as well.  I saw my first Amaryllis there – and couldn’t believe how tall those flower were!

Judy by an exhibit of Amaryllis – 1968

And the different varieties and colors of the tulips were amazing!  For some reason, I really liked the ones that were nearly black – such as Ace of Spades, and Black Beauty.  Wow! 

Ace of Spades

Black Beauty

Because it was April, many of the flowers that grew outside (rather than in the hothouses) and the trees were not in full bloom yet.

But the landscape of the gardens was still beautiful.

We stopped in Leiden at the Treslong Experimental Gardens.  Beautiful.

Treslong Experimental Gardens

Our last visit there was during the girls Spring Break from school in April, and it was cold and wet in Holland.  We almost didn’t go to Keukenhof, but were eventually glad we went, as it was actually warmer within the Gardens.  I guess all the trees provided some protection from the weather!

Later, my Mother came to visit us in Wiesbaden, and we took her to Holland.  Her visit was in May, and Keukenhof Gardens was in full bloom.

Mother (left in the red suit) in the Gardens

Much to our surprise, we learned that many Dutch people had to eat the tulip bulbs to live in 1944-1945 at the tail end of the war.  From a website from The Laidback Gardener:  Most bulbs such as hyacinths and daffodils are toxic to humans, but tulip bulbs are edible if they are carefully prepared.

And from the AmsterdamTulip Museum:  The situation in Amsterdam had grown hopeless, and in December a freeze started that would last for several months. Starvation became extremely common, and many perished. It was here, for the first time, that Tulip bulbs were eaten, along several other agricultural products not typically considered edible (such as sugar beets). 

Growers, unable to export their bulbs, began to sell them as food and market the high starch content. Doctors even began to provide recipes on how to prepare bulbs

After learning all this, we were amazed to see the fields and fields of tulips growing.  It was quite heart-warming to see how the tulip “industry” survived.

Fields of Tulips, picture taken from inside the windmill

One of our favorite places to visit in Holland was den Haag (The Hague).  And in den Haag is Madurodam.  A VERY favorite!!  From the Netherlands website:  

Madurodam provides a perfect combination of an amusement park, historical heritage and world-class nature.  With more than 5,500 miniature trees and 55,000 flower bed plants blossoming all season, the park is known for its scenic beauty.  We spent many hours going through this delightful park with its miniatures, built 1:25 scale.  Amazing!  It was a favorite of our daughters, as well.  We took my Mother there during one of her visits.  We can’t remember whether or not we ever took Fred’s parents there.  

Miniature Cathedral

Miniature Schipol Airport

Miniature windmills and canals

We stayed in a B&B on that trip with the girls.  We always enjoyed doing that on our jaunts around Europe.  The family was lovely, and the accommodations were wonderful!  I had made some chocolate chip cookies for our trip, and we shared them with the family.  I just remember telling them to come visit us in Heidelberg.  But their reply was that, thanks, but no thanks.  They would “stay” in Holland.  There was still a bit of animosity toward Germany from World War 2.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Random Memories of Germany

6 Dec

Wiesbaden-Part 3

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

It has been said Germans are known for beer and cuckoo clocks.  The American version of that is that, after being in Germany, Americans return stateside with either a baby or a cuckoo clock!  Well, we had the baby, but she was on-the-way before we even got to Germany!!  In any case, there was a store in downtown Wiesbaden that had the world’s largest cuckoo clock as it’s store front!  Here is a picture of that store front.  I really enjoyed wandering around that store.  But I did NOT want to come home with a cuckoo clock – and I didn’t!

We thoroughly enjoyed Christmas time in Wiesbaden.  Here are some pictures of downtown at night.  These were taken in 1968, so I don’t know if or what Wiesbaden does for decoration in 2020.  We enjoyed the city streets.  But we really enjoyed the “fairy tale” kiosks set up along the main street – Wilhelmstrasse.  These are just a few of the ones we saw.

Hansel & Gretel

There were several main streets in Wiesbaden, Rheinstrasse was one of them.  Ringstrasse was another.  Here are a few pictures of those streets.

Rheinstrasse looking toward Hainerberg

Rheinstrasse looking toward Ringstrasse and the Ringkirche

You can see the Ring Kirche at the end of Rheinstrasse heading up toward Ringstrasse.

We especially enjoyed seeing the churches along the way.  Here is the Marktkirche (Market Church).

The Marktkirche – as it was when we were there

There was a spa/park near downtown called the Kurpark.  Here is the Kurhaus, which was a casino at the time we were there.

Here is the fountain within the park.

It is a beautiful park, with some “Roman” touches to it.  In researching Wiesbaden, I found that Wiesbaden was indeed, occupied by the Romans in around the 370’s A.D.  WOW!

In April of 1968, Fred and I made a trip to Holland – my first visit there!  We left Karen with some church friends, and set out to enjoy ourselves!  We took in Amsterdam and all its sights.  We enjoyed an open-air market there. 

We stopped in Leiden to see the Treslong Experimental Gardens.  So well done.

We took in Haarlem with its magnificent cathedral.

The Bell Tower of the St. Bavo Church Credit Google search and Wikipedia

The pipe organ inside there has the distinction of having been played by G.F. Händel in 1740 and 1750, and in 1766 then ten-year-old Mozart!  WOW!!  Later, when we made the trip with my Mother, someone was actually playing the organ – and I was quite enthralled!  Beautiful! 

The organ pipes in the church of St. Bavo

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Random Memories of Germany

29 Nov

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

Wiesbaden Part 2

There were so many things about Wiesbaden that we enjoyed.  We actually loved living “on the economy” and among the German people.  They are a generous and loving people.  They were kind to us. 

The German people were generally kind about our feeble attempts to speak their language, and were appreciative that we made the effort to speak German.  We heard of many funny mistakes.  For instance, the gentleman who was a Baptist missionary – and friend of ours – told of the time he went into a store, wanting to purchase some grape juice (traubensaft).  When he told the store clerk what he wanted, the clerk looked at him, and tried VERY hard not to laugh, but it finally got away from him.  Wiping his eyes, he told the missionary that he didn’t have any of that – as he had asked for pigeon juice (taubensaft)!!  The words are only one letter different.

The church where we met were “partners” with a German Baptist Church – we shared the space.  And later – just as we were leaving Germany to head stateside, the churches jointly built a new building for both congregations to meet.  The English-speaking Baptist church there held its 25th anniversary during the time we returned to Germany (1980-1983), and we were able to attend that meeting – in that “new” church building.  It was an amazing time.

The “new” church building

Herman Stout speaking – the first American pastor of Immanuel Baptist Church.

All former pastors were in attendance except for the pastor while we were there.

We enjoyed taking short day or half-day trips around the area.  One of our favorite places to drive to was Konigstein, and the area from there was the Feldberg (field mountain).  Here is a picture of the Feldberg at Easter time, 1969.

On the Feldberg

We enjoyed shopping in the German stores, and just walking in downtown Wiesbaden.  One of our favorite department stores was Hertie.  As I remember, when our church congregation decided to purchase flatware for the church kitchen, we purchased it from there.

Downtown Wiesbaden – Hertie department store – Christmas 1968

In another post, I mentioned that the American housing where we lived for the final two years we were in Wiesbaden, always had a contest to see who could decorate the best.  Here is our apartment’s contribution in Christmas 1968, and Christmas 1969.

Our apartment is top left – 1968

1969

And here is a picture of the apartment building across from ours – the entire one side of the building went together to put together this Christmas “tree” in lights.  Fun.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Thanksgiving 2020

22 Nov

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

Thanksgiving 2020.  Well, we have to think seriously about what we have to be thankful for, don’t we?  

It’s certainly been a year of turmoil – but we are still alive!  I am thankful.

It’s been a year of uncertainty – but God is still on His throne and in control!  I am thankful.

It’s been a year of so many “hiding out” – but I/we have not done that.  I am thankful.  

Have you ever heard of Dr. David Jeremiah?  He is pastor of Shadow Mountain Community Church in San Diego, California. (www.DavidJeremiah.org)   He has a TV program called Turning Point.  I’ve not listened to his radio program, but I suspect it’s called Turning Point, as well.  He preaches God’s word, and we are blest every time we watch his TV program.  His organization publishes a monthly magazine and devotional guide called Turning Points.  The November 2020 issue interested me,

and as I was thumbing through the scripture and comments, I came to November 26.  What Dr. Jeremiah wrote really touched my heart, and I would like to share some of what he wrote:

“In the most general terms, the way to give thanks was expanded from the Old Testament to the New.  In the Old Testament, God was normally thanked “for” things – His works, attributes, and blessings (Psalm 106).  While that focus is maintained in the New Testament, it is expanded to giving thanks “in” all things (1 Thessalonians 5:18).  That is, in all circumstances.  We can do that because we know God causes “all things” to work together for our good (Romans 8:28)” [used by permission]

So how ‘bout it – do you give thanks to God “in” all things?  In every circumstance you find yourself?  How about if you lost your job during the pandemic?  Something in there to be thankful for?  How about if, during this year of lockdown, you find yourself developing an illness?

Way back, 20 years ago, when I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I tried very hard to not feel “WHY ME????” 

It helped me to see others who were worse off than I was.  There is always someone worse off than I am!  Okay, I had cancer; okay, I had a breast removed.  My mentor had both breasts removed!  She eventually died from a cancer they couldn’t totally remove with surgery.  

And so, I began to think of the “good” things in cancer:

1) yes, I had a breast removed, but I live in the age when they no longer remove the chest wall, and I can do everything normal with that arm.

2) God has used me to help other women who are going through the same thing, and are discouraged or frightened.  He has allowed me to be His instrument in many, many ways.

3) God used my cancer to bring me and my husband closer together than we had been.  Fred was my cheering squad – he even changed my drain tubes following surgery!

4)  God brought me closer to Him than I ever have been.  My church family has lifted me up time and time again.  Following my diagnosis, my first surgery wasn’t for another month, since it was a slow-growing cancer.  We had a trip planned and paid for, that we couldn’t miss.  When we returned home, there must have been 50 cards waiting in the mail for me – all from members of our church family.  And each one gave me encouragement – and all gave their favorite scripture – none of them the same.  God’s word is FULL of encouragement.

So yes, it’s been a time of confusion, but God is still on His throne, I am still alive in this world, and…

I AM THANKFUL!

May your Thanksgiving be a blessed one.

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Random Memories of Germany

15 Nov

Wiesbaden-Part 1

SUNDAY MEMORIES

My husband, Fred, joined the U.S. Air Force following his college and seminary education.

While he had intended to go into full-time ministry, God had other plans for him.  He was sent to San Jose, California to attend a year’s study/training in meteorology at San Jose State College (now University).  

Credit Google Search and San Jose State University website

During our stay in California, he received follow-on orders to Wiesbaden, West Germany.  He was to be assigned to the Weather Unit there, for the Air Force.  We were both excited about the prospect of living in Germany.  I had never been out of the U.S. (except for a couple of visits to Mexico as a teenager), so this was an exciting time for me.

I was pregnant with our first child at the time we left for Germany, and was a bit concerned when our baby stopped moving after we arrived on German soil.  However, I think she was just tired from that 8-hour flight – as was I – because she picked up the pace after a good rest!

We delighted in Germany.  We were unable to get into American housing right away, and lived “on the economy” the first year we were there.  That was an amazing experience, as well.  We found a house that rented to Americans, and we lived on the entire second floor of this house. 

1967 – Wiesbaden, Germany – Upstairs is our apartment – with the balcony

We didn’t have any furniture, so we were glad to find this house was furnished, since we were only allotted 2,000 pounds of “furnishings” by the U.S. government.  We purchased a car (actually two separate cars while there), and set up for living.

There was a lot about Wiesbaden we loved.  We lived just down the street from a beautiful park.  Fred and I would take walks through the park, and later, after our Karen was born, we would take her on buggy walks through the park.  The German people – especially the women – would stop us and ohhh and ahhh over Karen, and we were pleased.  

The park where we walked

We had originally decided to attend the military base chapel on Sundays, since Fred had grown up in chapel, and his father was an Air Force chaplain, but give our tithe to the English-speaking Baptist Church we found in town.  However, after visiting the church a few times, some of the members of the church, convinced us that we should indeed, be members of that little church.  And so we did.  While there, they moved from the “cellar” where they met, into a more up-to-date building.  I began playing the piano for that congregation during that time, and played until we left Germany.  That’s where we met Frau Katie.  Quoting myself from another post I wrote about Wiesbaden:

There was a nursery there [in the church], that was manned by a lady they called Frau Katie.  I think she really took a shine to us, since I would take Karen down to the nursery and nurse her.  That was when a lot of American women were against nursing their babies, and only using bottles.  In any case, Karen became a favorite of hers.

Karen and Frau Katie

On one of our last trips before we rotated stateside, we asked Frau Katie to stay with Karen while we were gone.  We later discovered that she was teaching Karen to speak German!  That gave Karen a head-start on German when we returned to Germany 10 years later.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

Random Memories of Germany

8 Nov

Paris Part 2

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

I think the most memorable trip was the bus trip we made to Paris with the girls in 1981 over New Year’s into 1982.  The first complaint we had was that, when we boarded the bus,

Credit Pixabay

we found that a lot of the single soldiers traveling together, had each wanted a window seat, leaving only one seat on the aisle for someone else.

On the bus

Therefore, when we found two seats together, we took that one.  The remaining two seats together were at the back of the bus.  Okay, that’s not much of a problem, except that was the “smoking section” on the bus, which was laughable.

Credit Pixabay

I mean, come-on – ANY smoking on a BUS would contaminate the entire bus.  But Fred was violently opposed to sitting among all that smoke, so I volunteered to sit in the back with one of our daughters.  The girls weren’t too pleased with the situation, and traded seats with each other quite often.  I especially remember that, being winter and cold weather, we had our coats and gloves with us.  And the girls would sit with my leather glove across their noses the entire time they sat in the back with me – they really couldn’t stand all that smoke!

Credit Pixabay

Also, on the trip home from Paris, quite a few of those riding with us, especially in the back of the bus, had been drinking.  I guess they had found a New Year’s party somewhere.  They were quite tipsy and loud – they particularly enjoyed doing the “Funky Chicken” over and over with much hilarious laughter.  I remember telling Karen, who was sitting with me at the time, that “this is real life – this is not a made-up movie to show you what drunk people are supposed to look like.”  She looked at me and stated that “they are stupid…and silly…and I will NEVER get drunk!!”  And she never did.  It was a great teaching moment.

But that story gets us away from our time in Paris.  We loved staying in the hotel, and the breakfasts they gave us of French bread, butter and jam,

Credit Pixabay

and the croissants (sigh)!  We just wished they had allotted us more than one croissant!  They were delicious!!

Credit Pixabay

We went to the Louvre, and spent quite a bit of time there.          

The Louvre with small arch

 We went up the Eiffel Tower.

The Eiffel Tower – Judy, Karen and Janet

We walked along the Trocadero and we told the girls about our 1969 visit to Paris, and the fountain with jets shooting water across the fountain.  

The Trocadero and water canons

We showed them  the statues we had seen along the Trocadero in 1969.

The Eiffel Tower from the Trocadero

 We went inside the Notre Dame and showed them the beautiful Rose Window with its stained glass.

We went to and inside Versailles, and took in all its beauty. 

 We saw Napoleon’s tomb. 

Napoleon’s Tomb

 We walked along the Champs Élysées and admired all the stores and the Arc de Triomphe.  We didn’t dare attempt to get to the Arc, as the traffic was suicidal!

The Arc in the setting sun…beautiful!

But, all in all, we thoroughly enjoyed our trip to Paris.  It was thrilling to us to know that we were in that beautiful country, and all the history that had passed through that lovely city and country.  If Fred and I ever go back to France, there are other places I would like to visit – Normandy, Marseille, Toulouse (mainly because my father stayed in Toulouse following WW1 for one year, and studied at the university there), Avignon, and just the French countryside.

Whether or not that comes to be, is anyone’s guess.  Well, I guess I should say that if it is God’s will, we will go there.  Otherwise, I’ll just be pleased God allowed us to see as much of France – and the world – that we did.  I am grateful.

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

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