Tag Archives: Memories of Dad

Father’s Day 2017

18 Jun

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

 

JUDY

 

 

 Another Father’s Day dawns this morning. As someone recently said, it’s such a pity that in today’s world of TV and comedy, fathers are portrayed as clueless and laughable. How are our boys and young men going to grow up to be the strong men of God that we want them to be, when that is their example? I am so glad that my father, my brother, and my husband grew up in times when men were, indeed, strong men of God, and spiritual leaders in their household.

And how are our girls and young women going to grow up, thinking that all the boys/men in their lives are luckless creatures – only to be tolerated? In watching the TV programs that are out there now – unfortunately including some of the current Disney programs – adults in general, and men in particular – are portrayed as stupid and ignorant, while their teenagers – and younger – are the “smart” ones. It just ain’t so, folks!

And since that was a rather depressing way to begin this post, let me get back to the men in my life who were strong believers in God and Jesus Christ, and were able to be strong, safe, places for me.

Let me tell you about my own father.

 

 

I’ve written other posts about my father (June 16, 2013; June 15, 2014; September 28, 2014; February 5, 2017) and the influence he had in my life. He was gone quite a bit – traveling around the state – but I always knew he loved me, and I looked up to him.

 

 

He was, indeed, the spiritual leader in our household.   He always took us to church with him, and our family life revolved around church and our belief in God.

 

 

Fred’s father – a second father to me after Fred and I married – was dedicated to God and His work in this world.

 

 

He was a pastor for a while, but then most of his life was doing God’s work as a military chaplain. And yet, with all that work, he was devoted to his family. He, too, was the spiritual leader in his family.

 

 

Fred and I both look back on our lives, and are so grateful that each of our fathers-in-law treated us like their son or daughter. I never felt out of place in Fred’s family, and Fred has said so many times that my father enjoyed him as if he were another son of his. We were so blest to have that in our lives.

 

And because of that, Fred grew up in a household that showered him with love – family love and God’s love. He grew to be a self-assured man that I am proud to call my husband. He taught our girls what a true man – a gentleman – is like, and what they should expect from their spouses.

 

And my brother, Bill, grew up in a household that taught him how to be a true man of God, as well. He gave his children God’s word, and the strength to be what God wants them to be.

 

Both of our girls have married men who are strong personalities, and are dedicated to the Lord. We pray for each member of their families, as they begin to have families of their own.

 

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There is a scripture that helps with this:

Start children off on the way they should go,

and even when they are old they will not turn from it.

Proverbs 22:6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Dad Could do Just About Anything

12 Jun

My Take

DiVoran Bowers Lites

 

 

Author, Poet and ArtistIf my dad were still with us, he would be 102 years old this month. I’m glad for him that he is in Heaven. Life is easier there than on earth. Now that I am older and wiser, and I believe I could understand him better, I’d like to have a visit with him

Dad always worked hard at whatever job he had. Some of his earliest memories were about going out to the barn to get oats for breakfast. He worked in his parents’ beauty parlor/barbershop and delivered papers. He learned to cook from his mother because there were no girls in the family for her to teach the finer arts of homemaking and hair cutting.

 

Grandmother, Dad as young man, Granddad, Dad’s Brother in front.

 

He rode his dad’s horse, Smoky, in races against the prisoners at the state penitentiary where his father worked, but he wasn’t allowed to win because it might affect his dad’s job.

 

Smoky, Granddad, DiVoran- see Dad’s feet in front of the power pole?

 

When I was a very small child, my mother felt a bit competitive because my dad seemed to be able to do everything. One day she said, “I’ll bet you can’t make DiVoran the cotton slip she needs.” Well, Dad sat right down at Mother’s 1934 Singer Sewing Machine and made the slip. Mother never challenged his talents again.

Every new endeavor Dad went in for required a move to a new town or state. When he and Mother married, he was a meat-cutter for Safeway in a small mining town in Nevada. When Mom’s dad died, my mother and dad moved back home so he could take over the job of keeping the gas company going. Sometime before WWII started, we moved to a small farming community and dad repaired machinery at the tomato factory. Near the end of the war, even though he was married and the father of two children, he was drafted and became an infantry man. When the war was over the couple bought a restaurant and bar. Dad also became a hunting and fishing guide, and a friend taught him how to fly a small airplane.

When it was time for the next change he became a security guard in a town called Los Alamos, but soon worked his way up to courier which required a move to Albuquerque and from there to Livermore, California.

In all he was a: commercial fisherman, farmer, vacuum store owner, lobsterman, and a grower of fruit and nut trees. He could fix just about anything and when he came to visit us, we always had jobs set up for him. I still have the jar opener under my kitchen cabinet.

 

 

 

When I use that jar opener I realize that he installed it about the time his hands started giving out. He had two carpal tunnel operations, but still the strength in his hands deteriorated to where I had to open packages of potato chips for him. I wonder if he thought ahead to the time when I might need something under the cabinet to help open jars, which is now.

Did I forget to mention that Dad liked kids?

 

 

Dad did work hard, but he was an artist too. He framed Mother’s paintings, and made birds from abalone shells to hang on the wall. He welded sailing ships and shrimp boats. He also hand-dipped chocolate. At one time in their lives Dad and Mother became rock hounds. Dad made a tumbler and polisher out of a small motor and a coffee can and soon Mother and Dad had a lot of semi-precious jewelry to give away.

 

 

Dad didn’t sell his art, the fish he caught, the venison he brought home, or the fruits and vegetables he grew. He gave it all away. One day he gave away his authentic totem-pole because a visitor saw it and asked for it.

 

 

 

 

Like a lot of kids, I took both my parents for granted. That’s why a visit would be so nice about now. Thank the Lord, they and we are eligible to meet in Heaven because we have given our lives to the Lord Jesus Christ. I’d love it if there were a time and place to sit down and talk with people we know and love. That may or may not be part of God’s plan, but if it happens to be, I’m up for it.

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