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Peru and the Amazon River~Part 2

18 Apr

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

Amazon River Commerce

As we traveled to our next location on the live a board, we saw several rafts along the way. They are going to a market to sell their goods.

They would build live aboard rafts with everything sellable even the balsa wood that makes the raft. They would live in them for days or weeks until reaching their destination where they could sell the goods. Then take a water service back home.

 

 

There are no bridges that cross the Amazon, mostly because there is no need, the majority of the Amazon River runs through rainforests rather than roads or cities.

The river is the principal path of transportation for people and produce in the regions, with transport ranging from balsa rafts and dugout canoes to hand built wooden river craft and modern steel hulled craft.

 

 

 

The river markets are busy. This is their grocery, pharmacy, household supplies and gathering place. They can buy many things including natural medicines for healing from the rainforest.

 

 

 

Some goods are brought to street markets in other locations. We were able to walk around here, but the guide would not allow us to bring money or cameras because of the pick pockets. A small distance away was a tent village full of the extremely poor.

 

Back on the boat, we docked at our next location where we will take a walk in the rainforest and visit the Shaman.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Peru and the Amazon River~Part 1

11 Apr

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

The Amazon and it’s Indigenous People

 

The Amazon River is the greatest expression of life on earth. The rainforest holds answers to questions we have yet to ask. But it is rapidly disappearing.

 

 

The Amazon River is by far the world’s largest river by volume. It has over 1,100 tributaries, 17 of which are longer than 1000 miles. The Amazon rainforest is the largest tropical rainforest in the world, covering 1.4 billion acres.

The Amazon is home to more species of plants and animals than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet — perhaps 30 percent of the world’s species are found there.

Although indigenous people have lived on their lands for thousands of years, they do not own it, because they have not filed “deeds” of land and do not possess a “title.” Therefore governments and other outsiders do not recognize their rights to the land. Indigenous peoples possess an enormous body of almost irreplaceable information and skills about living in the rainforest without destroying it.

 

 

“Within the next few decades, the fate of the world’s remaining indigenous peoples, the fragile environments they occupy, and the valuable knowledge that they embody could well be decided once and for all. A number of individuals, corporations, and states are already pursuing their own “final solutions.”

 

 

The 20th century will be remembered either as the century when we destroyed much of the Earth’s genetic and cultural diversity, or the century when peoples learned to live together and share their knowledge in order to maintain the diversity upon which we all depend. Great civilizations like the Mayas, Incas, and Aztecs developed complex societies and made great contributions to science. Living from nature and lacking the technology to dominate their environment, native peoples have learned to watch their surroundings and understand the intricacies of the rainforest. Over generations these people have learned the importance of living within their environment and have come to rely on the countless renewable benefits that forests can provide.

 

 

Cattle ranching accounts for roughly 70 percent of deforestation in the Amazon. The world’s forests need to be seen for what they are—giant global utilities, providing essential public services to humanity on a vast scale. They store carbon, which is lost to the atmosphere when they burn, increasing global warming. The life they support cleans the atmosphere of pollutants and feeds it with moisture. They act as a natural thermostat, helping to regulate our climate and sustain the lives of 1.4 billion of the poorest people on this Earth. And they do these things to a degree that is all but impossible to imagine.

 

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

A Journey to Peru and the Amazon River

4 Apr

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

As a child, I remember my father always watching travel shows on tv. Later in his life he was able to travel extensively after playing the stock market. He said he made more money doing that than ever working. I was so happy for him and my Mom. However, my Mom tired of traveling so my dad would go alone.
One day he asked me to go vacation with him to Peru on a live aboard boat down the Amazon River. I couldn’t contain my excitement. What an awesome opportunity he gave me. It was his last trip before he passed away. It was a most precious time.
I would like to share this series of incredible events and sights on this trip, which includes Peru, Nazca lines, the Amazon people and the way they live.

 

 

 

I am retired and enjoying life. My hobbies are my 5 grandchildren, son and daughter, and my loving husband. I am a photographer and extreme nature lover. I love spending time in my garden or in the wilderness connected to God my Creator.
Melody

Mingus Mill

28 Mar

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Mingus Creek Trail, Cherokee, NC

A half-mile north of the Oconaluftee Visitor Center is Mingus Mill. Built in 1886, this historic grist mill uses a water-powered turbine instead of a water wheel to power all of the machinery in the building. Located at its original site, Mingus Mill stands as a tribute to the test of time.

The fairly large building is powered by the water that rushes into the “millrace” from a diversion upstream.  The path leads all the way to where this diversion occurs.  As you walk up the millrace you’ll notice how the wooden planks that makeup the siding have remained firmly in place over the years. Although it was rehabilitated in 1968 by the National Park service, it is still an impressive sight to see.

Ride the Wave You’re Given

21 Mar

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

Sometimes you have to ride the wave you’re given. Unknown
Life is like riding a wave. To keep your balance, you must keep moving. Eric Carlson
Life is like the sea, it’s rough and rigid, or calm and still, but in the end, it’s always beautiful. Unknown
The ocean stirs the heart, inspires the imagination and brings eternal joy to the soul.    Wyland
Live in the sunshine, swim in the sea and drink the wild air. Ralph Waldo Emerson

There is a revelation of God in creation Psalm 19

14 Mar

A Time to Live

Melody Hendrix

There is a revelation of God in creation. His gospel is written in everything. As far back as I remember, I have been deeply connected to nature and the outdoors. As a child and even as an adult, stepping outside in nature was like arriving on an amazing planet. I am filled with awe and wonderment of the beauty and mystery before me. I run to explore everything great and small within my reach. I feel the presence of my Creator filling my soul with every breath. I almost hear His footsteps running with open arms to greet me. My spirit wide awake open to every morsel of knowledge and beauty I can possibly soak up. All my senses are alive with the sight, smell, sound and touch of God’s Holy presence.  A combination of inner peace and excitement comes over me. I fearlessly start exploring and unfolding the mysteries of all that surrounds me. When something catches my attention, I open my eyes, not only to see the common, but to see beyond that, to understand its role in the perfect workings of nature. What is its life story? Where does it fit in for the human race?

I believe everything we need to live, heal and survive, God has put on this earth for us. He gave us a mind to figure out the purpose of each entity and how to use it for good and not evil. Instead of treading on nature and destroying everything beneath our feet with no regard for it’s real worth, we must understand that it is Holy and is needed to sustain us. And some things are even simply for our pleasure.  We live like we have another planet to go to after we trash this one. I plead that we honor our Father’s precious gifts of earth and sky. Please don’t let our Godly gift be packaged and artificial as it seems to be transforming into. I pray our natural resources will not be traded for money or poisoned by greed. And I pray our future generations can look away from their electronics and know what is real.

God’s Precious Gift….Time

7 Mar
A Life to Live
Melody Hendrix
Melody
Time has a wonderful way of showing us what really matters.  Margaret Peters
The bad news is, time flies. The good news is, you’re the pilot. Michael Altshuler
You have thousands of thoughts a day. Don’t waste them on negative things. Unknown
Time is the most valuable coin in your life. You and you alone will determine how that coin will be spent. Be careful that you do not let other people spend it for you. 
Carl Sandburg
At the end of life, what really matters is not what we bought but what we built; not what we got but what we shared; not our competence but our character; and not our success, but our significance. Live a life that matters. Live a life of love. 
Author unknown
It’s really nice to wake up in the morning realizing that God has given me another day to live. unknown
time-2

You’re Still Growing

21 Feb

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

Melody

Quotes authors unknown
Something will GROW from all you are going through. And it will be YOU.
A seed alone in the dirt with no light begins to rot and fall apart. From that very dis-integration a life force sprouts, reaches for the light and in its own time, blossoms.
When life is hard don’t wish it were easier, decide to be stronger.
Where ever God has planted you, bloom with Grace.
bleeding-heart

Metamorphosis -God’s miracle

14 Feb

A Life to Live

Melody Hendrix

Melody

The earth is the Lord’s, and all its fullness. Psalm 74:17

O Lord, how manifold are Your works! In wisdom You have made them all. The earth is full of Your possessions. —Psalm 104:24

Among God’s creatures, the butterfly is one of the most stunningly beautiful!
This flying insect, while supplying us with visual enjoyment, also supplies us with amazing examples of the marvels of God’s creative work.

For instance, the majestic monarch butterfly can travel 3,000 miles on its migration to Central America—only to end up at the same tree its parents or even grandparents landed on a generation or two earlier. It does this guided by a brain the size of a pinhead.
Or consider the monarch’s metamorphosis. After the caterpillar builds a chrysalis around itself, it releases a chemical that turns its insides to mush—no perceptible parts. Somehow from this emerges the brain, internal parts, head, legs, and wings of a butterfly.

One butterfly expert said, “The creation of the body of a caterpillar into the body and wings of a butterfly is, without doubt, one of the wonders of life on earth.” Another expert feels that this metamorphosis is “rightly regarded as a miracle.”

“How manifold are [God’s] works!” (Ps. 104:24)—and the butterfly is but one of them.

We stand amazed, God, at the awesome creation You allow us to enjoy. From distant galaxies to beautiful butterflies, You have given us a world that speaks loudly of Your love for us. Thank You, Lord, for creation.

8 Fun alligator facts you may not know

7 Feb

A Life to LIve

Melody Hendrix

1.  American alligators have been observed using lures to hunt birds. They balance sticks and branches on their heads, attracting birds looking for nesting material.
2.  Alligators are ecosystem engineers. Alligators play an important role in their wetland ecosystems by creating small ponds known as alligator holes. Alligator holes retain water during the dry season and provide habitats for other animals.

3. Alligators are carnivorous but recently reported to also eat fruit such as wild grapes, elderberries, and citrus fruits directly from trees. Alligators may help spread the seeds of these fruits throughout their habitats.

4. The temperature at which the eggs develop determines their sex. Eggs exposed to temperatures above 93°F (34 °C) become males, while those at 86 °F (30 °C) become females. Intermediate temperatures produce both sexes.

5.  Alligator courtship is sophisticated. At the start of the spring breeding season, males bellow to attract females. The bellows have an infrasonic component that can cause the surface of the water around the male to ripple and dance. Other courtship rituals include head-slapping on the water’s surface, snout and back rubbing, and blowing bubbles.

6  large individuals bite down with 13,172 Newton’s or 2960 pounds–of force, one of the most powerful bites ever recorded for a living animal.
7.  Serum in American alligator blood is incredibly effective at combating bacteria and viruses, meaning that even alligators that lose limbs in mucky swamps often avoid infection.

8 Alligators mate in June. Males may fertilize several females in one mating season.
gator-2
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