Church-Part 4

25 Sep

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

We stayed in the church in San Antonio

First Baptist Church San Antonio, TX, Sanctuary – from a post card

until it was time for Fred to be transferred.  He was given orders to go to Tyndall AFB, Florida (in Panama City), and so we moved there.

Photo credit WJHG.com  Credit Google search

We did one stop along the way, to stay and visit with one of my Dad’s brothers, Uncle Ed and his wife, Aunt Joecilla, in Louisiana.  They were special people to us.

Karen was reading quite well by this time, having finished second grade.  Uncle Ed wasn’t in good health then, and one day, when looking for Karen, I found her at Uncle Ed’s side (he was reclining on the couch), sitting on a foot stool, reading to him.  He was enthralled, and she was in her element.  It’s a memory I cherish.

We finally made it to Tyndall AFB, but there was essentially no guest quarters for us to stay in, so we were put up in a motel outside the base.  We were there about two or three weeks, much to our regret.  At night, the roaches came out to play, and we always heard them.  The room had a kitchenette, and we had some paper plates and cups that we heard the roaches frolicking around.  Yuck!!

We started looking for a church home, and there were quite a few Baptist Churches around the area.  There was one church we really liked – Fred and I liked our Sunday School class, the girls both liked their Sunday School class, the preacher was good…but the choir was just about half-a-pitch off in everything they sang.  Talk about fingernails on the blackboard!  Nope nope nope – we couldn’t endure that.

We had decided long before, that we could be happy in whatever size church God placed us.  We had been in large, small, and smaller churches.  We finally visited the First Baptist Church in downtown Panama City.    While FBC Panama City wasn’t as large as FBC San Antonio, it was still one of the largest churches in Panama City.

Credit Google search and FBC Panama City website

Despite not having the same home feeling I’d had with FBC San Antonio, it was still a comfortable feeling.  As with the FBC in San Antonio, we joined and participated in the Sunday School…the choir…and all things that go along with church, including Fred being asked to serve as a Deacon, which he did.  It was a lovely church, and we thoroughly enjoyed our time there.  We were members of that church for the five years we lived at Tyndall AFB.

An interesting side note about Tyndall AFB – Fred’s father, a U.S.A.F. Chaplain, had been stationed at Tyndall back in the 1950’s, and was Base Chaplain.  The small chapel where he preached was still there, but they had built a newer one by the time we were at Tyndall.

One other side note about living in Panama City:  I joined a women’s bowling league, and enjoyed that sport.  One bowling morning, I woke up with a pain in my side/back.  When I threw the first ball, I knew something was wrong, and stopped playing.  I went immediately to the base ER.  After xrays were done, they discovered that I had a hairline fracture of one of my ribs!  How did THAT happen?  No idea.  The following Sunday, at church, I was holding the elevator door open with my body, so our girls could come out and go to their Sunday School class.  The door started to close – on my back! – and that’s when I realized it had done the same thing the previous week!  So THAT’s how that happened!  I jokingly told a Deacon that I was going to sue the church, and he said, “all we can give you is the elevator!”  Fortunately, I didn’t need an elevator.

I had heard talk at the base that the townspeople really liked the Navy people on the West side of town, but the AF people weren’t held in very good graces.  Knowing ourselves, we just turned up our noses at that attitude, and dug in with both feet!  And before we left that base and town and church…they were quite sorry to see us go.  I like to think we changed the attitude of some of those same townspeople with our willingness to be where and what God wanted us to be, while we were in that place.  Of course, that was our attitude with every move we made while Fred was active duty.

WE….ARE THE CHURCH!

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

This is Something You Cannot Do Without

24 Sep

Walking by Faith, Not by Sight

Janet Perez Eckles

Reblogged September 24, 2022

September 22, 2022

Hubby walked in with groceries, he put them away and got busy on another mystery task.

“Got something for you,” he said. He took my hand and placed them on a crystal vase filled with flowers. He described each, detailing their beautiful colors.

Sweet, isn’t he? Well, me, on the other hand, not so much. I’ve told him, very gently, I might add, that flowers are great, but since I can’t see them, it’s kind of a waste of money.

I have hinted, suggested, and downright told him, instead, to get me an outfit, gift certificate to a spa, dinner out, etc.

But before you shake your head with disbelief at my rude, cold lack of appreciation, you might have expressed similar reactions.

The Lord insists on handing you the gift of confidence, yet traces of insecurity filter through. He hands you His grace, yet you look to please Him by scurrying through tasks. He repeats He’d be your companion, yet you worry about facing tomorrow alone.

He said He’d calm the seas and quiet the storms, yet you tremble at the thought of impending adversity. He hands you the gift of His Word to guide you, yet you follow your own personal GPS for your life, for your plans and desires.

Something we cannot do without.

In all that mess, there’s something we cannot do without. We all need to work in accepting the bouquet of God’s faithfulness. The one that doesn’t change with circumstances, but emphasizes the certainty of His protection.

Nestled in that protection, even when feeling anxious, stressed, or lonely, He’s handing you a bouquet of fragrant, trustworthy, and sweet promises, ones that last and prevail through dark moments.

He arranges them in the crystal vase of His love and adds the same reassurance He promised to Zion: “Provide for those who grieve in Zion—to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair. They will be called oaks of righteousness, a planting of the LORD for the display of His splendor (Isaiah 61: 3).”

The splendor He displays didn’t end with any pandemic. It didn’t stop when the economy went down. And it doesn’t diminish its glimmer when bad news echo everywhere. The power of His Word still stands, His joy remains, and His promises for a new tomorrow are still secure in His hands

Let’s Pray

Father, when the odor of adversity wafts into my life, I will receive the flowers of your promises. I will inhale their aroma to delight my soul with confidence for today and reassurance for tomorrow. In Jesus’ name.

What have you done with the gifts God offers you?

Janet

______________________________________

I invite you to dance with me—celebrating one of my books, “Contagious Courage: A 30-Day Journey to Overcoming Stress and Anxiety.” Get your copy HERE and tell your friends, too.

Did you know I wrote a book filled with words of encouragement, uplifting thoughts and illustrations of real-life triumph to empower you? Its title, Trials of Today, Treasures for Tomorrow: Overcoming Adversities in Life. You can get it HERE.

CLICK HERE for a one-minute inspirational video.

Looking for a speaker for your upcoming event? A great speaker makes the difference between a so-so event and one that shines with impact. I invite you to view one of my two-minute videos HERE.

Please share: Feel free to share Janet’s posts with your friends.

Let’s connect:

Janet Eckles Perez

Some say she should be the last person to be dancing. Her life is summarized in this 3-minute video: http://bit.ly/1a8wGJR

Janet Perez Eckles’ story of triumph is marked by her work as an international speaker, #1 best-selling author, radio host, personal success coach and master interpreter. Although blind since 31, her passion is to help you see the best of life.

www.janetperezeckles.com

2022 Road Trip-Part 4B

21 Sep

A Slice of Life

Bill Lites

Day 4 Continued (5/19/2022)

As I checked out the old Sciple’s water mill, I noticed a hand-written sign that pointed to the Water Mill Opry House across the road, and I just had to take a photo of that old place.  It looked to be as old as the water mill and was all closed up.  I wouldn’t have believed it, but their website informs me that on Saturday nights its standing room only for folks who come from all over Mississippi to enjoy the country music of Ed Sciple’s band and participate in some of the wildest boot-scootin’ and hi-steppin’ dancing around these parts.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

After that wild ride in the countryside, I continued north 60 miles on SR-39 & US-45 to where I visited the Tennessee Williams Home located in Columbus, MS.  I don’t believe I ever read any of Tennessee Williams’ books, but I have enjoyed the movies made from some of his books.  I was the only visitor at the time, and the curator took the time to show me thru the entire house, pointing out little details as we went thru the various rooms.  A framed quote by Tennessee Williams said, “I was composed of a little Welsh wildness, a lot of puritan English, and a big chunk of German sentiment.”  That pretty much said it of the man.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Not far from the Tennessee Williams Home I visited the White Arches house there in Columbus.  This original “Columbus Eclectic” home was built by Jeptha V. Harris in 1857 and is on the list of homes shown on Columbus’ Annual Spring Pilgrimage.  The museum was closed when I was there, but the photo below shows the unique Greek Revival, Gothic, and Italianate design of the house with all its 19th century grandeur.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Now I headed north 35 miles on US-45 to visit the Aberdeen City Hall Museum located in Aberdeen, MS.  This 1912 building turned out not to be a museum, but the operating Aberdeen City Hall.  My mistake.  This was another case of me not reading all the words about a given museum or subject.  My wife, DiVoran, keeps telling me, “You have to read ALL the words Bill.”

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

While I was driving around Aberdeen, I noticed an Aberdeen Mississippi Blues historical marker in front of a Blues Mural on the side of a building.  I stopped to get a photo and read all about the Mural.  Not being a big blues fan, I didn’t know about Booker ‘bukka’ White, Chester Aurthur ‘Howlfn’ Burnett, and Albert King being born in Aberdeen, and about the mural dedicated to the Aberdeen Mississippi Blues artists.  Now I’m a little more informed.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

I continued north 30 miles on US-45 to visit the Tupelo Automobile Museum located in Tupelo, MS.  I was expecting to get a look at their 175 beautifully restored cars.  But when I got there, the museum was closed, and from what I have heard, its permanent, and all their cars have been put up for sale.  What a bummer!  So, I headed over to check out the Tupelo National Battlefield located just on the outskirts of Tupelo.  This battlefield was the location of the July 1864 ‘Battle of Tupelo’ otherwise known as the ‘Battle of Harrisburg’ where the Union forces claimed a victory.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Now I headed over to visit the Elvis Presley Birthplace there in Tupelo.  Even though DiVoran and I were Elvis fans when we were teenagers, neither of us knew he was born and raised in Tupelo.  So, this was a new experience for me.  I learned that he sang in the local Assembly of God Church choir from an early age and got his first guitar at age ten.  In the years after his family moved to Memphis, TN in 1948, he and his cousins, Jerry Lee Louis, later known as ‘Mr. Rockabilly’ and Jimmy Swaggart, later known as ‘The Evangelist’ spent a good deal of their time hanging out with many of the early black Jazz and Blues performers who frequented the Beale Street clubs and restaurants.  This is where it is suggested that a lot of the Blues, Jazz, and Southern Gospel they heard seeped into their souls and into their music.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Now, I gave Greta (My Garmin) the address of my motel there in Tupelo and she took me right to it.  After I got checked in and got my things into the room, I warmed up my leftover fried Catfish dinner from the Blue Crab Grill and enjoyed that delicious meal again.  Yummm!  Then I tried to watch some TV but there was nothing worth watching, so I recorded my days activities and went to bed.  What a long day this has been!

—–To Be Continued—–

Bill is a retired Mechanical engineer living with his wonderful artist/writer wife, DiVoran, of 65 years in Titusville, Florida. He was born and raised in the Southwest, did a tour of duty with the U.S. Navy, attended Northrop University in Southern California and ended up working on America’s Manned Space Program for 35 years. He currently is retired and spends most of his time building and flying R/C model airplanes, traveling, writing blogs about his travels for Word Press and supporting his wife’s hobbies with framing, editing and marketing.  He also volunteers with a local church Car Care Ministry and as a tour guide at the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum there in Titusville.  Bill has two wonderful children, two outstanding grandchildren, and a loving sister and her husband, all of whom also live in Central Florida, so he and DiVoran are rewarded by having family close to spend lots of quality time with.

One of Bill’s favorite Scriptures is:  John 10:10

No Shame or Confusion

19 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

In you, O Lord, do I put my trust and confidently take refuge; let me never be put to shame or confusion.

Psalm 71:1 

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Church-Part 3

18 Sep

SUNDAY MEMORIES

Judy Wills

As I mentioned last time, we were in northern Maine only one year – 13 months actually.  The day following our daughter’s birth, Fred looked at me and said, “you don’t really want to stay here another year, do you?”  I nearly jumped out of the hospital bed, with a resounding “YOU GOT ORDERS!!”  And he did.  We were to go to San Antonio, Texas, for Fred to teach at the Officer Training School at Lackland AFB.

Credit Google Search and JBSA website

And so we transitioned from Maine to Texas, with some stops along the way.  We visited Fred’s parents and family in D.C. and New Jersey;

Fred’s grandmother and family

With Fred’s mother in D.C. (Dad taking the picture)

We visited my brother’s family in Titusville, Florida (my mother had remarried five years after, daddy’s death, and they were on their honeymoon in Florida), a stop at St. Augustine, Florida,

St. Augustine, FL – Judy, Karen and baby Janet

before heading to Texas.  I had some family in San Antonio, on my mother’s side, and we were able to stay with Aunt Lillie, while we looked for a house.

Aunt Lillie with Karen and Janet

There was a family stationed at Lackland that we had known in Wiesbaden.  They invited us to visit their church, which we did.  It was a relatively small church, and the husband led the choir.  Since he knew I played the piano, he asked me to play for the Christmas program for his choir…which I did.  However, once again, we didn’t feel that church was exactly where God wanted us to be.  So we visited some others in the general area.

My mother had spent quite a bit of time growing up in different areas of Texas and Oklahoma, and had been a secretary at the First Baptist Church in downtown San Antonio for many years.  During that same time my dad was Associate Sunday School Secretary for the Southern Baptists in Texas, and he made many trips to San Antonio.  I believe he told me he was teased quite a bit from his fellow workers about all the trips he “needed” to make to San Antonio after he met mom.  In any case, they had quite a few friends from that church.

Daddy

And so, being a good daughter, I called one of mother’s best friends from that church.  She was glad to hear from me.  After chatting a while, she asked if we had found a church home yet.  At my “no,” she quite forcefully said, “don’t you join anywhere until you visit First Baptist Church!”  So we agreed that we would meet up with her that following Sunday at FBC.  

For the first time in my life, as I walked in that huge church, the feeling was….home.  I knew almost instantly that THIS church was where God wanted us to be for the next three years.  I don’t believe I’ve had that definite a feeling about any church since.  It was a wonderful and warm feeling, and I loved it.

We joined the church…we joined the choir… we joined the Sunday School that was in our age group.  It was just a wonderful time in our lives.  I was also involved with the Young Women’s Fellowship Group.  To find more about that, please refer back to my post of September 19, 2021 “Friendship.”  It tells about the church, as well as that group and what we did in the community.

First Baptist Church San Antonio, TX, Sanctuary – from a post card

We thoroughly enjoyed our time in that church.  We didn’t much care for the 30-minute drive to-and-back home from downtown, but we learned that we make time for what we want to do.  And attending that church was what we wanted to do.

I started this series with a question: “…do you love to GO to church?”  Well, this church had us in its hands, and we LOVED to GO to church.  It was a fantastic experience.

WE….ARE THE CHURCH!

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~i

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

2022 Road Trip-Part 4

14 Sep

A Slice of Life

Bill Lites

Day 4 (5/19/2022)

This morning after breakfast I drove over to check out Landrum’s Homestead & Village located there in Laurel, MS.  It was early and this living history museum was closed, but their website informs me that the museum is a replica of an 1800s southern Mississippi settlement with historically accurate buildings, such as a general store, smokehouse, trading post, schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, chapel, and Indian village.  The museum also hosts several family-based events throughout the year to celebrate several holidays.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Not far from the Landrum’s Homestead Village I visited the Veterans Memorial Museum located in downtown Laurel.  This museum is home to a huge assortment of military artifacts and memorabilia, dating from the Civil War, that reflect the stories, deeds, and sacrifices of our courageous men and women from all branches of U.S. military service.  The museum also hosts special events, throughout the year, such as the recent “Rolling Thunder 3” (June 11, 2022) which honored those veterans who gave the ultimate sacrifice in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Then I headed north 55 miles on I-59 to visit the Key Brothers Aviation Exhibit located in the Meridian Regional Airport terminal at Key Field in Meridian, MS.  Key Field takes its name from Al & Fred Key who broke the standing flight endurance record of 23 days.  From June 4 to July 1, 1935 the Key brothers flew over Meridian for a total of 27 days (using some of the earliest refueling methods known at the time-bucket and hose) to help put Meridian on the map during the Great Depression. 

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

I drove into downtown Meridian where I wanted to visit the Jimmie Rogers Museum, but it was closed.  I was disappointed to miss that museum as Jimmie Rogers, known as “The King of Western Music” has been one of my favorite western singers ever since I was a teenager.  Bummer!  

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

A few blocks away, I visited the Meridian Railroad Museum.  This museum is located in the old restored 1906 Union Station depot and displays many antique railroad artifacts and memorabilia.  The museum also has a model railroad layout depicting early Meridian, as well as several pieces of rolling stock, which includes a 1917 Baldwin Steam locomotive in the process of being restored.  Amtrak still uses a portion of the station on a daily basis.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

One of the Railroad Museum curators had told me how Mr. George W. Soule (1849-1922), an entrepreneur and inventor, had built the Soule Foundry & Museum across the street and that I should check it out.  The museum was closed but many indications around the area said that she was right.  I saw this historical marker in the Depot Park near the Soule Museum.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

My last stop there In Meridian was to visit the Antique Dentzel Carousel located in the Highland Park area.  This original carousel building is the centerpiece of the park which opened in 1906.  The carousel was built by Gustov Dentzel of Philadelphia, PA in 1896 for the 1904 St. Louis Exposition, and was later sold to the city of Meridian.  The carousel figures were hand-carved from poplar and basswood, and hand-painted with oils to match the carousel’s canopy and surrounding building walls.  An amazingly beautiful piece of machinery.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

Next, I continued north on SR-39 about 30 miles to visit the Sciple’s Water Mill located in De Kalb, MS.  It wasn’t easy to fine the place in that rural part of Kemper County Mississippi, but Greta (My Garmin) finally found it.  I wasn’t sure if the building was going to continue to stand long enough for me to take a photo.  Built in the early 1800s by the Sciple family, this water mill has been in continuous operation all these years and still provides ground corn meal and whole-wheat flower for local residents.

Photo Credit: Bill Lites

—–To Be Continued—–

Bill is a retired Mechanical engineer living with his wonderful artist/writer wife, DiVoran, of 65 years in Titusville, Florida. He was born and raised in the Southwest, did a tour of duty with the U.S. Navy, attended Northrop University in Southern California and ended up working on America’s Manned Space Program for 35 years. He currently is retired and spends most of his time building and flying R/C model airplanes, traveling, writing blogs about his travels for Word Press and supporting his wife’s hobbies with framing, editing and marketing.  He also volunteers with a local church Car Care Ministry and as a tour guide at the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum there in Titusville.  Bill has two wonderful children, two outstanding grandchildren, and a loving sister and her husband, all of whom also live in Central Florida, so he and DiVoran are rewarded by having family close to spend lots of quality time with.

One of Bill’s favorite Scriptures is:  John 10:10

Trust God

12 Sep

My Take

DiVoran Lites

Before you do anything, put your trust totally in God and not in yourself. Then every plan you make will succeed.The Lord works everything together to accomplish his purpose.

Proverbs 16:3

Photo credit: Pixabay

The Flowers, the Sunset and the Trees

DiVoran has been writing for most of her life. Her first attempt at a story was when she was seven years old and her mother got a new typewriter. DiVoran got to use it and when her dad saw her writing he asked what she was writing about. DiVoran answered that she was writing the story of her life. Her dad’s only comment was, “Well, it’s going to be a very short story.” After most of a lifetime of writing and helping other writers, DiVoran finally launched her own dream which was to write a novel of her own. She now has her Florida Springs trilogy and her novel, a Christian Western Romance, Go West available on Amazon. When speaking about her road to publication, she gives thanks to the Lord for all the people who helped her grow and learn.  She says, “I could never have done it by myself, but when I got going everything fell beautifully into place, and I was glad I had started on my dream.”

Church-Part 2

11 Sep

SUNDAY MEMORIES

We left San Jose, California to go to Wiesbaden, West Germany.  Because Fred’s father was a U.S. Air Force Chaplain, and Fred had grown up attending the base Chapel wherever they were, we decided we would attend the Chapel on base but contribute our tithe to the local Baptist Church.  We had checked, before we left the States, and found a Southern Baptist Church meeting in Wiesbaden – Immanuel Baptist Church.  It was the first of what became of the European Baptist Convention (now the International Baptist Convention). We met with some of the people from that church, telling them what we wanted to do.  They seemed to think that was a strange plan – and asked us to reconsider and worship with them each Sunday.  This church had at least 200 members.  And so we began our three-year membership with that Baptist Church.  This was not the pressured appeal we had with the church in San Jose – it was just a “why don’t you give us a try” sort of thing. 

When we first met with them, they were meeting in the basement of a building at 17 Taunusstrasse.  It was not the glorious building that we envision when we think of “church” in this country.  And to get to the nursery, it was almost like going through the catacombs!  After about a year-and-a-half, the group moved our worship to another building – but not in the basement – 81 Adelheidestrasse.   I am SO glad Fred remembers these details!   As I remember, it was not actually a church building but an office building.  I began playing the piano then for that church, and so missed out on any Sunday School program they had.  I have no memory of where the Sunday School classes met.

Before we left Wiesbaden, our group, along with a German  Baptist congregation, went together to build their own building.  They together had purchased the property for the building.  We saw the plans for the building, and it was wonderful.  We wished we could be there for the building and worshiping that would take place there.

Immanuel Baptist Church – Wiesbaden, West Germany

Well, we returned Stateside after our three years in Germany, much to our sorrow.  We really loved living in Germany!  God played a trick on us as we came back.  Fred and I  had often said to each other – “if we ask the Air Force to send us to New Mexico, do you suppose they will send us to Maine?”  Well, that’s just what happened!  Fred was assigned to Loring AFB, Maine.

We found there were two Baptist churches in the local area, but only one had Southern Baptist connections.  It was a relatively small group, and they met in the Odd Fellows hall.  It was not ideal – frequently on Sunday mornings we would arrive to find there had been a beer-fest in that building the night before, and the place was in shambles!  We had to clean up everything so we could have church.  

And this is where I say again – the “church” is NOT the building – it is the “people” that make the church.  We met in that horrible place and worshiped our God together – THAT is the church!  We made some wonderful friends there – many of whom we still are in contact with after all these years.  Again, before we left, the group was planning on building a “church building” for them to meet in.  They did that very thing in the few years after we left Maine.  And again, we were only there for 13 months.  We didn’t know that at the time we arrived in Maine – we were planning on another three-year tour of duty.  Thank goodness God had other plans for us!  

WE…ARE THE CHURCH!

~~~~~~~~~~To Be Continued~~~~~~~~~~

Judy is living in Central Florida with her retired U.S. Air Force husband of 50+ years. Born in Dallas, Texas, she grew up in the Southwestern United States.She met her husband at their church, where he was attending the university in her town. After college and seminary, he entered the Air Force, and their adventures began.They lived in eight of our United States, and spent six years in Europe, where their oldest daughter was born. She was a stay-at-home mom for many years .

  Judy has always been involved with music, both playing the piano and singing. Always interested in exercise, she was an aerobic dancing instructor, as well as a piano teacher for many years, and continues to faithfully exercise at home.

After moving to Central Florida, she served as a church secretary for nearly nine years.Her main hobby at this point in time is scanning pictures and 35mm slides into the computer. She also enjoys scrapbooking.She and her husband have two married daughters and four grandchildren, including grandtwins as well as a great-grandson and a great-granddaughter. She and her husband enjoy the Disney parks as often as possible.

My Mother’s Chair

8 Sep

On the Porch

Onisha Ellis

My mom and dad had matching easy chairs. I inherited one of them. It’s not in the best of shape, but I can’t seem to part with it. A lot of good memories are tethered to the chair. But there is one not so good memory, or so it seemed at the time.

As my mom aged, I lent a hand with the housekeeping. One of the chores I found annoying was dusting their dual level end tables. I think when my parents passed to Glory, we donated them to a local charity. They are now called mid-century collectibles and I found this picture on Etsy. If you like mid-century, check out their store, this one is handmade! The picture below is a modern version.

Back to the annoying part…dusting was easy but moving all the stuff my mom kept scattered all over it was a pain. I frequently murmured internally, “geez mom, can’t you put stuff away?” Hand creams, foot creams, nail files, peanut butter crackers that she called “nabs”, lottery scratch off tickets, a magnifying glass..you get the picture. Some items I would return to their proper places but for the most part, I moved them, dusted and put them back.

I didn’t get then why she was so messy but having just attained septuagenarian status, I am beginning to get it. One, my septuagenarian self tires more easily than my forty-ish self. Why put something away that I am going to have to go back and get. Two and this is the big one for me, if something gets put away, there is a good chance I might not remember where I put it!

Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay

I was thinking this week that mom would have gotten a kick out of seeing my messy self now.

One of our friends made up this cool gift for my big 7-0. On each dollar bill she placed a Post-it note with a birthday message on it.

The length of the one dollar bills brought to mind Proverbs 3:1-2

My son, do not forget my teaching,
but let your heart keep my commandments,
for length of days and years of life
and peace they will add to you.

I'm a winner

After my retirement, I decided to re-learn the canning and preserving skills I learned from my mother but hadn’t practiced for twenty years. I titled the blog Old Things R New to chronicle my experience.  Since then I have been blessed to have six other bloggers join me, DiVoran Lites, Bill Lites,  Judy Wills, Louise Gibson, Janet Perez Eckles and Melody Hendrix

In addition to blogging, I work as the publicist/marketer/ amateur editor and general  “mom Friday” for my author daughter, Rebekah Lyn. I also manage her website, Rebekah Lyn Books  

My 2022 goal is continue to use my love of photographs and words to be an encourager on social media.

2022 Road Trip-Part 3B#

7 Sep

A Slice of Life

Bill Lites

Day 3 Continued (5/18/2022) 

Photo Credit:Bill Lites

I asked about the two names for the museum and the curator of the museum told me all about the Three Notch Road that is part of the history of Andalusia.  Seems that in 1824 the US Army built a 230-mile road from Pensacola, FL to Fort Mitchell, AL part of which (90 miles) went thru Andalusia.  Legend has it that the surveyor, a Captain Daniel E. Burch, used three notches cut in trees along the route to guide the construction workers that followed, and the name stuck.

Photo Credit:Bill Lites

After that quick history lesson, I headed west another 55 miles US-84 to visit the Old Monroe County Courthouse located in Monroeville, AL.  This famous structure was built in 1903 and served as the Monroe County courthouse until 1963 when government offices were moved to a new building on the town square.  The town of Monroeville and the courthouse are famous as the location where, in 1962, Gregory Peck and Mary Badham stared in the Award-winning movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird” was filmed.  I also learned that the Pulitzer Prize Winning author of that book, Harper Lee, grew up in Monroeville, just a few blocks from the old courthouse, where the movie was filmed.

Photo Credit:Bill Lites

Now it was another 35 miles northwest on US-84 to where I visited the Clarke County Museum located in Grove Hill, AL.  The museum is housed in the Alston-Cobb antebellum house that was built in 1854 and is nestled in the piney woods of southwest Alabama.  The museum houses artifacts and memorabilia from prehistoric, Native American, pioneer, antebellum, and Victorian periods about Clarke County’s history. 

Photo Credit:Bill Lites

Pioneer Day is an annual event on the grounds of the Clarke County Museum where local re-enactors, dressed in period costumes, demonstrate many early 1800s tasks the settlers had to perform, such as syrup making, shingle splitting, clothes washing, butter churning, flint knapping, cotton spinning, basket making, horse shoeing, corn shuck doll making, and games for the children.  Blue Herron, a Creek Indian, sets up an authentic replica of a Creek hunting village there on the grounds of the museum where visitors can experience some of that local native culture’s historic activities.

Photo Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/51650726950719578/  

After leaving Grove Hill, I continued west on US-84 another 20 miles, where I planned to stop at the 4-Gal’s Restaurant in Coffeeville, AL for a meal, but they were closed (Covid-19 I guess).  So, needing to get to my motel before all the rooms were taken, I just kept heading west on US-84 passing thru Silas, AL and across the border into Mississippi, and thru Waynesboro before finally arriving at my motel in Laurel, MS for the night.  After I got checked in, I asked the motel clerk if he could recommend a good place to eat.  He said, if I liked sea food, that the Blue Crab Grill was not too far, so I tried it.   I had their Fried Catfish platter, with a sweet potato, corn-on-the-cob, and a side of onion rings.  It was delicious!  I give the Blue Crab Grill a 5-star rating for their food!

Photo Credit: tripadvisor.com/Blue Crab Grill/Laurel,MS  

—–To Be Continued—–

Bill is a retired Mechanical engineer living with his wonderful artist/writer wife, DiVoran, of 64 years in Titusville, Florida. He was born and raised in the Southwest, did a tour of duty with the U.S. Navy, attended Northrop University in Southern California and ended up working on America’s Manned Space Program for 35 years. He currently is retired and spends most of his time building and flying R/C model airplanes, traveling, writing blogs about his travels for Word Press and supporting his wife’s hobbies with framing, editing and marketing.  He also volunteers with a local church Car Care Ministry and as a tour guide at the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum there in Titusville.  Bill has two wonderful children, two outstanding grandchildren, and a loving sister and her husband, all of whom also live in Central Florida, so he and DiVoran are rewarded by having family close to spend lots of quality time with.

One of Bill’s favorite Scriptures is:  John 10:10

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